Java-Gaming.org Hi !
Featured games (83)
games approved by the League of Dukes
Games in Showcase (524)
Games in Android Showcase (127)
games submitted by our members
Games in WIP (592)
games currently in development
News: Read the Java Gaming Resources, or peek at the official Java tutorials
 
    Home     Help   Search   Login   Register   
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6
  ignore  |  Print  
  JDK 8 is released  (Read 9635 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #120 - Posted 2014-03-25 18:21:37 »

I understand gene9 completely in the way that he is so enthusiastic about his favorite tool, but of course also the other side which is a bit annoyed about the derailing of this topic.

The big Java 8 features: lambdas and streams are very Scala-esque features. And on the discussion of Java syntax changes, Scala is really completely relevant. It's a very Java-like language with many cut & dry pareto enhancements. The principal guy behind Scala used to be a JDK guy so this makes sense. That is unfair to claim comments regarding Scala as off topic.

And to give the syntax side of the discussion one more argument. Syntax like the try with resources is very needed, because it let us do the right thing without burden us with unnecessary boilerplate(having to close resource by hand in a safe way).

Sure, the try-with-resources, was a mild improvement in Java 7.

Java 8 is bigger. I am maintaining a large Java 6/7 code base. There are dozens of time I see:

- Code manually converting a collection of one type to another type. Could be simplified with a "map" operation in Java 8 or even JavaScript.
- Code manually filtering a collection. Could be simplified with a "filter" operation in Java 8 or even JavaScript.
- Code manually aggregating a collection. Could be simplified with a "fold" operation in Java 8.
- Code manually dealing with null issues. Could be simplified with a decent "Optional" type as in Java 8.

Honestly, all of the above could be done in Java 6/7 with an add-on library like Functional Java, but it's nice to have a high quality implementation in the core library. And have nice lambda syntax rather than the anonymous inner class system.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #121 - Posted 2014-03-25 18:32:10 »

I am old, and busted, and cynical, and jaded. I've been programming now for 33 years. Quite frankly I'm sick of it. I'm especially sick of having the rug pulled out from underneath me. I like the slow pace of change in Java because it gives what's left of my brain time to figure out how to use the changes.

Cas, this is really a horrible attitude.

You should probably give programming as a whole a rest and try something else. Find a better balance between personal satisfaction and your basic obligations to society. Take some classes, ramp up another skill set, do some consulting in another industry. Try raising a family - that often gives people deep purpose and satisfaction. You can't just stew in a career that you've lost interest in. And you can't fault the rest of the tech world for any of your weird personal issues.
Offline BurntPizza

« JGO Bitwise Duke »


Medals: 273
Exp: 5 years



« Reply #122 - Posted 2014-03-25 18:46:24 »

Cas, this is really a horrible attitude.

You should probably give programming as a whole a rest and try something else. Find a better balance between personal satisfaction and your basic obligations to society. Take some classes, ramp up another skill set, do some consulting in another industry. Try raising a family - that often gives people deep purpose and satisfaction. You can't just stew in a career that you've lost interest in. And you can't fault the rest of the tech world for any of your weird personal issues.

I'll let him tell you his situation, but you don't know the people behind the screen names. You can't make assumptions about people without any background. Sure, your own utopia sounds fine and dandy, but it simply doesn't work like that, especially for other people with an entirely different life.

IMHO he has given perfectly reasonable reasons as to why he "persists" with Java, and I have never seen any faulting of others for personal "issues" from him.
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #123 - Posted 2014-03-25 18:59:00 »

I'll let him tell you his situation, but you don't know the people behind the screen names. You can't make assumptions about people without any background.

I'm not trying to judge his soul or worth as a human. If he says he is sick of programming, I will tell him to at least consider giving it a rest and trying something else for a change. There are minimal personal assumptions being made.

Since this thread is about JDK 8 programming language and syntax innovation: you can't counter a point about type inference or types on the right vs C-style with all kinds of personal issues.
Offline BurntPizza

« JGO Bitwise Duke »


Medals: 273
Exp: 5 years



« Reply #124 - Posted 2014-03-25 19:03:36 »

There are minimal personal assumptions being made.

If/when he replies, you will likely see the massive irony here.

you can't counter a point about type inference or types on the right vs C-style with all kinds of personal issues.

Pretty sure you can, given that the use of any programming language is a personal choice, at least if you are your own boss. (Spoiler: Cas is.)

Especially since he never said either was objectively 'better' than the other, he merely is stating his opinion. Everyone has the right to their opinion.
If you want to help with on-topic discussion, let's talk objectively why the new JDK is better than what it was.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #125 - Posted 2014-03-25 19:36:39 »

If/when he replies, you will likely see the massive irony here.

I eagerly await the unveiling of this massive irony Smiley

Especially since he never said either was objectively 'better' than the other, he merely is stating his opinion. Everyone has the right to their opinion.

Ideally the opinions shared are interesting or relevant. If you don't like Scala syntax because it involves change and you have some dark personal trauma to deal with... You should probably be dealing with the dark trauma and not posting on this board.

If you want to help with on-topic discussion, let's talk objectively why the new JDK is better than what it was.

Didn't I just post on several specific JDK 8 features that I feel are really useful: map, filter, fold, and Optional?!?! No one commented on those.
Offline Riven
« League of Dukes »

« JGO Overlord »


Medals: 833
Projects: 4
Exp: 16 years


Hand over your head.


« Reply #126 - Posted 2014-03-25 19:42:45 »

Be nice, or I'll MAKE you nice! Cranky



(wait wut?)






On topic: structs coming from Oracle will be 2-3 years away. Besides, if you don't control whether they are stack allocated, heap allocated or mapped to a ByteBuffer, it's of little use, as the JVM has a pretty bad track record on escape analysis, and being able to map structs is pretty much mandatory to achieve any high performance goals. The issue however is that the JVM has to somehow guarantee that the backing buffer of the struct(s) isn't janked from underneath, resulting in memory violations or (worse?) undefined behavior.

We saw how they enforced these guarantees with MappedByteBuffers, which as a result are pretty much useless. I fear we'll be dealing with garbage collected structs.

Hi, appreciate more people! Σ ♥ = ¾
Learn how to award medals... and work your way up the social rankings
Offline gimbal

JGO Knight


Medals: 25



« Reply #127 - Posted 2014-03-25 20:26:00 »


* I am old, and busted, and cynical, and jaded. I've been programming now for 33 years.

Wow, you are truly a veteran. Respect that you managed to hang on for so long, I'm pretty sure I'm going to stop doing programming for a living when I hit the 20 year mark to prevent becoming busted, cynical and jaded before I get old. Maybe because I want to stop or maybe because the market forces me, I don't like the way its evolving right now.

I think the last thing I want to do before I go out is design a user interface scheme for tablets and phones (or whatever device they come up with by then; maybe laptops will be back in fashion) which you operate by banging your head against the screen.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #128 - Posted 2014-03-25 20:46:27 »

Respect that you managed to hang on for so long, I'm pretty sure I'm going to stop doing programming for a living when I hit the 20 year mark to prevent becoming busted, cynical and jaded before I get old. Maybe because I want to stop or maybe because the market forces me, I don't like the way its evolving right now.

Interesting subject, but completely off topic from JDK 8. I'll start a new thread...
Offline ctomni231

JGO Wizard


Medals: 99
Projects: 1
Exp: 7 years


Not a glitch. Just have a lil' pixelexia...


« Reply #129 - Posted 2014-03-26 01:20:58 »

Hmmm... Interesting discussion.  So Java 7 is to if-else as Java 8 is to ternary operator? Pointing

There is a subtle truth to what Cas said. If you want a new language, you just switch to it. But, it is unproductive to continue learning new languages every time a small feature is wanted. Java is very close to perfection, but I feel its connection to its legacy code is what is keeping us from getting all we want from the language.

I mean, Java has flexibility on its side. We are able to leverage C, JavaScript, Python, and other languages easily without being a dreaded glue language. There is a novelty that other languages can't match. Structs is and always will be the most wanted feature for me. Seriously, I can survive without much else... But the speed that it offers when programming C is just... unmatched and hard to replicate in Java.

Honestly, Java 8 is just a weak update. We got a few syntax improvements and a little bit of JVM improvements. In the grand scheme of things, I feel we are in no better position than we were in Java 7. The bigger looming problems still remain, like how people still have security issues. Also how Java is just getting harder to deploy due to them completely ridding of Applets and Webstart.

Languages are made so we have it easier to deploy applications. With Java, the amount of hoops we have to jump through is just making it harder for us as well as our user base to run something. Honestly, making Java easier to deploy for end users is the most important thing.

In my opinion, I am tired of celebrating syntax improvements. They are nice, but I feel as a development community for Java, we are grasping at straws. We should fight to make Java more accessible. It is shameful that a language that runs everywhere has so much problems with easy deployment. It is shameful that we can't even guarantee each user will be able to share a similar experience due to them blocking Java completely.

This thread was doomed to derail. I mean, to me... I just feel as though Java 8 is a very small step, but it lacks direction. The update doesn't change anything for users. It barely changes anything for us, other than helping our programs be a little smaller and faster for less readable code. I just hope our user base stays long enough to hit Java 9...

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline Riven
« League of Dukes »

« JGO Overlord »


Medals: 833
Projects: 4
Exp: 16 years


Hand over your head.


« Reply #130 - Posted 2014-03-26 05:40:06 »

Well, syntax improvements are important in one area: advanced concurrency code. The anonymous inner class syntax really got in the way of writing maintainable code. Barely anybody uses Java for this usecase, but we'll have to see whether that was a chicken and egg problem.

Hi, appreciate more people! Σ ♥ = ¾
Learn how to award medals... and work your way up the social rankings
Offline Roquen
« Reply #131 - Posted 2014-03-26 07:09:27 »

It seems to me that there is some pretty big blowing off the changes in this release makes in terms of things you can now easily do in plain old java.  It's not too surprising since, quite frankly, examples you'll find floating around a very boring.

I don't get why they haven't done multidimensional arrays yet.  It's trivial sugar.
You can write your own mega simple wrapper class. There are almost zero limitations to that. I don't see how this is holding anyone back at all.
Java isn't a rewriting language.  Neither is scala (unless I misread the spec or it's been added since).  So the only choice is for this to go into a compiler.  You suggestion shows you don't understand why it's an issue.  And a pretty minor one on it's own...more interesting if we got flattened into the container and field accessors for elements.

Quote
The syntaxes advances over Java 7 are legitimately important. They definitely aren't petty things like semicolons or not. You can write much cleaner, more concise, maintainable code with something like Scala.

You guys are just content with Java syntax and haven't understood that stuff enough to appreciate the value.

Do you guys have any publically hosted code that you think is decent? I guarantee that if I could look at some mildly non-trivial code you guys write, I could show you and possibly convince you how it could be better in Scala.
I understand languages pretty well.  Don't underestimate people's knowledge.
Offline CommanderKeith
« Reply #132 - Posted 2014-03-26 12:40:29 »

It's a pity that Oracle charge companies for distributing commercial java programs on ARM devices.
What kappa linked to about asm JavaScript is pretty amazing. That sounds like the way forward

Offline pjt33
« Reply #133 - Posted 2014-03-26 12:58:27 »

Failing that, Java, with structs/value types/mapped objects, ascii operator definition, and multidimensional arrays. Those three things will complete the language for me.
Reified types would be nice, but I don't think they're going to happen. Too many problems with backwards compatibility.
Offline Roquen
« Reply #134 - Posted 2014-03-26 13:07:14 »

Maybe..maybe not.  There's been some talk about killing off String identity...that'll certainly break some things.  For real generics all you'd really need is an option to suppress the verifier from puking.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #135 - Posted 2014-03-26 14:09:22 »

I just feel as though Java 8 is a very small step, but it lacks direction. The update doesn't change anything for users. It barely changes anything for us, other than helping our programs be a little smaller and faster for less readable code. I just hope our user base stays long enough to hit Java 9...

- Java 8 is a big change, with a clear direction. Proper lambdas and streams are big deals. I'll say it again: map, filter, fold, Optional. Big deal. Plus tons of library and VM level changes.
- Java 8 is more about developer facing improvement rather than user facing improvement.

It is shameful that we can't even guarantee each user will be able to share a similar experience due to them blocking Java completely.

Java applets are dead and that's a good thing. Users should block Java in their browser. But users are fine with embedded runtimes and libraries that they don't have to think about. Look at games like Wakfu that embed a Java runtime where most users don't even realize the game was completely written in Java.

I just hope our user base stays long enough to hit Java 9...

If you are waiting for a new version of Java or some other external factor to make the product that you want, you are just making excuses for yourself.

Nothing should be holding you back today from making the product you want to create.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #136 - Posted 2014-03-26 14:17:02 »

Reified types would be nice, but I don't think they're going to happen. Too many problems with backwards compatibility.

- What's important is to support primitives in generics without any boxing cost. Scala already does this. Notice with Java 8, you can have Stream<Integer> with boxing but they also offer IntStream, LongStream, etc that don't have boxing. Ideally, Java wouldn't need this type of complexity and could just do Stream<int> with no boxing cost.
- Runtime type erasure is not a big deal. It breaks reflection. If you want a super advanced compiler that does maximum code checking and verification at compile time and _not_ at runtime, you should be not be using much reflection. Type erasure is still slightly negative in terms of runtime debugging profiling tools.
- Reified types is on the list for Java 9.
Offline Roquen
« Reply #137 - Posted 2014-03-26 14:24:41 »

Type erasure sucks.  Again: type refinement as an example.  The real problem isn't the coding (which is easy) of the thing...it's that it would have required a change in the verifier.  As since the verifier isn't enforcing we have to jump through dumb hoops that everyone (compiler & runtime) "know" aren't needed.

If you are waiting for a new version of Java or some other external factor to make the product that you want, you are just making excuses for yourself.

Nothing should be holding you back today from making the product you want to create.
For me:  nothing is holding me back.  That product just doesn't run on the JVM.  Wink
Offline junkdog
« Reply #138 - Posted 2014-03-26 14:26:42 »

- Reified types is on the list for Java 9.

Are you sure about this? If so, it seems that all I'm missing expect operator overloading is scheduled for java 9. Happy times (in 3-4 years)!

artemis-odb: bugfixing and performance optimized fork of artemis ECS
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #139 - Posted 2014-03-26 15:28:34 »

Well, syntax improvements are important in one area: advanced concurrency code. The anonymous inner class syntax really got in the way of writing maintainable code. Barely anybody uses Java for this usecase, but we'll have to see whether that was a chicken and egg problem.

- LOTS of people use Java for advanced concurrency.
- Java is actually awesome for concurrency. The concurrency library is generally excellent. Executor Service, fork/join, concurrent collections, atomics, Futures. Java 8 adds a Promise (they call it CompletableFuture), "Adder"s, big improvements to concurrent collections, and of course lambdas.
- Great async libraries like Netty. Also Play Framework which has a Java API.
- Akka. That's a pretty cutting edge framework for parallel and distributed applications. Much better than classic MQ type products. This is updated to take full advantage of Java 8.
- Scala is slightly nicer some syntactic flourishments (for comprehensions, pattern matching), but it's not necessary. Java is completely adequate for writing great clean, elegant, parallel, distributed software. BTW, Scala's concurrency features are built completely on top of JDK and use Java ExecutorService, fork/join, etc, so Scala benefits from JDK 8 too.
Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #140 - Posted 2014-03-26 15:30:25 »

Type erasure sucks.  Again: type refinement as an example.  The real problem isn't the coding (which is easy) of the thing...it's that it would have required a change in the verifier.  As since the verifier isn't enforcing we have to jump through dumb hoops that everyone (compiler & runtime) "know" aren't needed.

I don't follow what you are saying at all. The verifier internal to the JDK? Are you talking about performance issues?
Offline Riven
« League of Dukes »

« JGO Overlord »


Medals: 833
Projects: 4
Exp: 16 years


Hand over your head.


« Reply #141 - Posted 2014-03-26 16:41:26 »

Well, syntax improvements are important in one area: advanced concurrency code. The anonymous inner class syntax really got in the way of writing maintainable code. Barely anybody uses Java for this usecase, but we'll have to see whether that was a chicken and egg problem.

- LOTS of people use Java for advanced concurrency.
- Java is actually awesome for concurrency. The concurrency library is generally excellent. Executor Service, fork/join, concurrent collections, atomics, Futures. Java 8 adds a Promise (they call it CompletableFuture), "Adder"s, big improvements to concurrent collections, and of course lambdas.

"barely anybody" == less than 1% / a tiny minority, I stick by that statement, as very, very few Java developer actually grasp advanced concurrency theory and behavior in the JVM.

- Java is actually awesome for concurrency. The concurrency library is generally excellent. Executor Service, fork/join, concurrent collections, atomics, Futures. Java 8 adds a Promise (they call it CompletableFuture), "Adder"s, big improvements to concurrent collections, and of course lambdas.
I never said it wasn't awesome, or not full featured. The code to use these gems, however, extremely verbose and hairy, which was what I identified as a problem...

Hi, appreciate more people! Σ ♥ = ¾
Learn how to award medals... and work your way up the social rankings
Offline nsigma
« Reply #142 - Posted 2014-03-26 18:02:33 »

- LOTS of people use Java for advanced concurrency.
very, very few Java developer actually grasp advanced concurrency theory and behavior in the JVM.

Unfortunately those two statements aren't mutually exclusive!  persecutioncomplex

Praxis LIVE - open-source intermedia toolkit and live interactive visual editor
Digital Prisoners - interactive spaces and projections
Offline ctomni231

JGO Wizard


Medals: 99
Projects: 1
Exp: 7 years


Not a glitch. Just have a lil' pixelexia...


« Reply #143 - Posted 2014-03-26 21:19:33 »

It is shameful that we can't even guarantee each user will be able to share a similar experience due to them blocking Java completely.

Java applets are dead and that's a good thing. Users should block Java in their browser. But users are fine with embedded runtimes and libraries that they don't have to think about. Look at games like Wakfu that embed a Java runtime where most users don't even realize the game was completely written in Java.

"Look at games like Wakfu that embed a Java runtime where most users don't even realize the game was completely written in Java."

This. This is the problem right here...

Since when did writing in a language become so bad that we have to make it seem like we don't write in it. I'm proud to say when I write something in Perl, Python, C++, C#, Haskell, and JavaScript. However, when something is written in Java we are working a lot harder to cover it up than actually be proud to state it exists. The extra overhead (and space) our programs have to endure can be avoided if safety and ease of use for our users was better maintained.

Writing applications (and games) is a competitive market. The last thing anyone needs is the language itself pushing against users using the product. It is just inefficient, and it results in us having to waste a lot more time and money working around the faults.

I'll be keeping my eye out for advanced concurrency applications. I mean, most applications will have a difficult time taking full advantage of it. We can already leverage threads well enough for gaming applications, but in this regard, there might be some breakthroughs. It is hard to tell as this release is still fairly new.

From a developer standpoint, Java 8 makes our code a lot more efficient to write and faster in the JVM. I can't refute that. However, what use is there for a fast program if we still have to deal with the security and user access issues. It just seems counter-productive to me...

Offline gene9

Senior Devvie


Medals: 10



« Reply #144 - Posted 2014-03-26 22:16:06 »

"Look at games like Wakfu that embed a Java runtime where most users don't even realize the game was completely written in Java."

This. This is the problem right here...

Since when did writing in a language become so bad that we have to make it seem like we don't write in it. I'm proud to say when I write something in Perl, Python, C++, C#, Haskell, and JavaScript.

Console games often use C++ for the base game and something like Lua for higher level scripting and use various middleware library like Havok physics: At no point does the user need to be aware or understand what C++ or Lua or Havok is. The game just works. And programmer types can learn more and read developer Q&A. Java should work the same way.

Game devs don't have to be ashamed of something like Lua, but users should be able to play the end game without thinking about the development end of things.

However, what use is there for a fast program if we still have to deal with the security and user access issues. It just seems counter-productive to me...

There are no security or user access issues with something like Wakfu, at least not compared to than any other downloadable game made in any other dev tool.
Offline Riven
« League of Dukes »

« JGO Overlord »


Medals: 833
Projects: 4
Exp: 16 years


Hand over your head.


« Reply #145 - Posted 2014-03-26 22:53:31 »

This. This is the problem right here...
Clientside Java pissed off developers: unstable plugin, no backwards compatibility whatsoever.
Clientside Java pissed off average Joe: unstable plugin, guaranteed browser freezes, constant nagging for updates shipped with nasty toolbars.

Clientside Java pissed everybody off. So there. That's the problem right there. You can't blame aforementioned Joe for a healthy aversion regarding Java, trying to obliterate every single JRE he can find, for the sake of browser security, too.

Next time I embed a JRE, I'll disguise it so well, only antivirus software can find it -- after which it will make an attempt to lock its files, and crash the JRE... yeah, there is no hope.

Hi, appreciate more people! Σ ♥ = ¾
Learn how to award medals... and work your way up the social rankings
Offline HeroesGraveDev

JGO Kernel


Medals: 296
Projects: 11
Exp: 3 years


┬─┬ノ(ಠ_ಠノ)(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻


« Reply #146 - Posted 2014-03-27 02:46:00 »

We have a problem with programming languages. We are trying to rank them against ones that don't belong.

As far as I'm concerned, there are 3 commonly used types of programming (not scripting) language:

1. Well used, well tested, well developed languages. (C, C++, C#, Java, etc.) Good for maintaining legacy applications/libraries, but are struggling to keep up with the times.

2. Web languages. (JavaScript, PHP, HTML if that can be counted as a language). I know I said not scripting, but these are really your only option for web development.

3. Next-gen languages. (D, Go, Rust, Scala, Python, etc.). The next set of languages that aim to fix something in any of the previous languages.
To be successful, they have to be compatible with existing toolchains, and quickly get the libraries and bindings that people will need. If they do this, they are extremely useful. If they don't, they flop. They can also flop when they try to do too much, and just create a mess. (looking at you, Scala)

Extremely low-level (ASM, etc.) and esoteric languages left out because they're not commonly used.

Languages start off in #3, and if successful enough, will eventually end up in #1 when technology moves on. The longer one can stay in category 3, the better, and also the longer it will stay in #1 when it eventually falls behind. Web languages (very limited) just go in #2.

Offline Roquen
« Reply #147 - Posted 2014-03-27 07:32:35 »

Type erasure sucks.  Again: type refinement as an example.  The real problem isn't the coding (which is easy) of the thing...it's that it would have required a change in the verifier.  As since the verifier isn't enforcing we have to jump through dumb hoops that everyone (compiler & runtime) "know" aren't needed.

I don't follow what you are saying at all. The verifier internal to the JDK? Are you talking about performance issues?
Yes the bytecode verifier in the VM.  Since it wasn't changed to enforce the type-bounds all JVM languages must emit bytecodes that will pass as if they aren't there.  In most cases I expect there is no performance hit as the back-end is likely to be able to remove the runtime typechecking and/or artificially injected access methods.  Java the language reflects this...that the annoying part.  Needed to cast a known to known and/or suppressing warnings.
Offline princec

« JGO Spiffy Duke »


Medals: 422
Projects: 3
Exp: 16 years


Eh? Who? What? ... Me?


« Reply #148 - Posted 2014-03-27 09:37:54 »

Generics with primitive types and no boxing would be great. Large chunks of unnecessary code and performance issues cut out in a trice.

Cas Smiley

Offline Roquen
« Reply #149 - Posted 2014-03-27 09:45:01 »

Let me refine that:  we need a type macro system (code specialization of types).  I'd be nice if it were runtime (VM aware), but that's doable without JVM support.
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6
  ignore  |  Print  
 
 
You cannot reply to this message, because it is very, very old.

 

Add your game by posting it in the WIP section,
or publish it in Showcase.

The first screenshot will be displayed as a thumbnail.

toopeicgaming1999 (57 views)
2014-11-26 15:22:04

toopeicgaming1999 (50 views)
2014-11-26 15:20:36

toopeicgaming1999 (10 views)
2014-11-26 15:20:08

SHC (24 views)
2014-11-25 12:00:59

SHC (24 views)
2014-11-25 11:53:45

Norakomi (26 views)
2014-11-25 11:26:43

Gibbo3771 (24 views)
2014-11-24 19:59:16

trollwarrior1 (36 views)
2014-11-22 12:13:56

xFryIx (75 views)
2014-11-13 12:34:49

digdugdiggy (52 views)
2014-11-12 21:11:50
Understanding relations between setOrigin, setScale and setPosition in libGdx
by mbabuskov
2014-10-09 22:35:00

Definite guide to supporting multiple device resolutions on Android (2014)
by mbabuskov
2014-10-02 22:36:02

List of Learning Resources
by Longor1996
2014-08-16 10:40:00

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-08-05 19:33:27

Resources for WIP games
by CogWheelz
2014-08-01 16:20:17

Resources for WIP games
by CogWheelz
2014-08-01 16:19:50

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-07-31 16:29:50

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-07-31 16:26:06
java-gaming.org is not responsible for the content posted by its members, including references to external websites, and other references that may or may not have a relation with our primarily gaming and game production oriented community. inquiries and complaints can be sent via email to the info‑account of the company managing the website of java‑gaming.org
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Managed by Enhanced Four Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!