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  Crash - Corrupt File, Months of Work Lost  (Read 13143 times)
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Offline Slyth2727
« Posted 2015-03-20 01:40:10 »

I flipping my shit right now, big time. I was working on a large project and my computer blue screened and when I booted back up the ONE important source file I needed was corrupted somehow. It's a .cs file and it's 1.5k+ lines long. Losing it is NOT an option. I haven't done any backups either because I'm stupid. I've tried using Recuva, it gives me a partially complete file but around 1k lines are still NULL. There are no other versions of the file on the disk, Visual Studio didn't make any backups. Essentially I'm completely screwed right now unless you guys can give me any help. I've worked for at least 6 months on this project and if I lost it... I don't know that's just incomprehensible.

I've decompiled the binary of the apparent last build but the code it gives me is at least 4 months old so the majority of my modern code is missing. I haven't run a CHKDSK /f yet because I'm using that as a last resort just in case any you guys ideas require me to not have rebooted.

Please help me out here. I'm dying.
Offline DarkCart

JGO Kernel


Medals: 124
Projects: 9
Exp: 50 years


It's all in the mind, y'know.


« Reply #1 - Posted 2015-03-20 01:44:34 »

Is this Windows, Linux, or Mac?

The darkest of carts.
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #2 - Posted 2015-03-20 01:45:53 »

Windows
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline DarkCart

JGO Kernel


Medals: 124
Projects: 9
Exp: 50 years


It's all in the mind, y'know.


« Reply #3 - Posted 2015-03-20 01:58:24 »

If you're using Windows 7, Microsoft's website may have what you're looking for.

If you're on Windows 8, again, Microsoft's website has the answer

I hope this helps.

The darkest of carts.
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #4 - Posted 2015-03-20 02:00:46 »

Unfortunately that's only for specified folders.. No dice Sad
It's really kind of starting to sink in now. God this f**king sucks. I suppose nobody else has any suggestions...?
Offline DarkCart

JGO Kernel


Medals: 124
Projects: 9
Exp: 50 years


It's all in the mind, y'know.


« Reply #5 - Posted 2015-03-20 02:05:13 »

Have you tried System Restore on Windows 8?

The darkest of carts.
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #6 - Posted 2015-03-20 02:08:45 »

I haven't... I'll do the CHKDSK and if that doesn't work I'll try to do a restore. The last point was about a week ago but the only code I've written since then was a bit of radian lerp code which shouldn't be hard at all to rewrite. I just have to hope and hope that it affects my file. Thanks for reminding me; If this works I'll... I don't know but I will love you.
Offline DarkCart

JGO Kernel


Medals: 124
Projects: 9
Exp: 50 years


It's all in the mind, y'know.


« Reply #7 - Posted 2015-03-20 02:12:59 »

You're welcome, glad I could help.

The darkest of carts.
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #8 - Posted 2015-03-20 02:14:45 »

Dammit. It doesn't affect it. Jesus... Well.. I guess it's over. This really really sucks, badly. Probably the most crushing and demotivating thing to happen to me, ever. I'm not exaggerating when I say 200+ hours of work. This was my Battlefield hack. My reversed SDK, GUI code, mathematics, everything. So this isn't just my code, this is the time I spent reverse engineering the game. This is so messed up.
I suppose I'll be uploading everything to github every 10 minutes from now on....

I need therapy Sad please send ice cream
Offline SHC
« Reply #9 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:15:53 »

Aren't you using a Version Control? If so you could pull from your repository again. If you are using Visual Studio, it has Git integration built in, and BitBucket/CodePlex offers you free private repositories. You should be using them to prevent these kinds of losses.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #10 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:32:05 »

I said in the op that I wasn't. I know. Don't lecture me on it. I'm retarded.
Offline Icecore
« Reply #11 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:45:24 »

Try use some restore software - many off them,
I use this – not perfect but fast and sometimes help = PC INSPECTOR File Recovery
Also i try many another software – they find something but file full of byte mass.
so don't find what i can recommend.

Also searching in google, ppl recommend this - http://www.runtime.org/data-recovery-software.htm
I Don’t try it self)

Also last recovery option is use some sort old DOS utilities for recovery – they are best but search spend so much time

Last known State: Reassembled in Cyberspace
End Transmission....
..
.
Journey began Now)
Offline jonjava
« Reply #12 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:47:20 »

Get Git (msysgit/Git Bash for windows).

Learn the basics (like 10 commands).

Use the cloud (dropbox, bitbucket, github, gitlab...).

Be living the dream.


As a side note: Why aren't/weren't you using version control?

Offline ziozio
« Reply #13 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:47:41 »

I've never used Visual Studio, but does it have a directory specifically for compiled files. I know you decompiled a 4 month old version but you must have compiled it in VS since then. The "output path" location must have some files.
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #14 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:55:54 »

I'll look into some more data recovery software but I'm not hopeful... Unfortunately when I tried to run the code for the first time after the crash it produced some exe for some reason that's unexecutable. I've given up really.

EDIT: I SEE LIGHT I REPEAT I SEE LIGHT WILL UPDATE SHORTLY
Offline Icecore
« Reply #15 - Posted 2015-03-20 05:58:59 »

I've never used Visual Studio, but does it have a directory specifically for compiled files. I know you decompiled a 4 month old version but you must have compiled it in VS since then. The "output path" location must have some files.
i think you'r right, when you run project VS compile source somewhere in temp folder

but Imho: 2k lines is not big and you write them,
so to restore them you spend half – full day, max 2
its no so critical as you think it be.

I also lose some code in past Wink
(some times start rewriting something and after 2-3 days understand I do something wrong, sometimes rewrite all from scratch, and yes I start use Git for own projects only 5 month ago ^^ so yes, I understand you’r problem)

And after so many time I now know code is not important – if you write him self, you can do it again and with new knowledge you do it even better =)

Last known State: Reassembled in Cyberspace
End Transmission....
..
.
Journey began Now)
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #16 - Posted 2015-03-20 06:11:31 »

Well the nightmare is over! I retried decompiling, and tried a different exe I hadn't checked before... And there we go. Code saved. Of course the decompiler outputted some funky names for variables but other than that, everything is intact. I am so relieved right now. Wow. Off to github.
Offline ddyer
« Reply #17 - Posted 2015-03-20 06:37:12 »

The correct answer starts like this: "six months ago, establish a reliable backup procedure..."
Offline Cero
« Reply #18 - Posted 2015-03-20 13:55:54 »

well I dont use version control / git unless I work in a group.
I just backup to 2 different external HDDs, dropbox and google drive in my case, YMMV but I dont see the point in using version control in that case.
I mean I wanna save my assets too... they are always more valuable.

Offline 65K
« Reply #19 - Posted 2015-03-20 14:50:33 »

Even as single developer, version control is invaluable.
- for tracking down bugs
- for developing features in separate branches
- for freezing published software and applying fixes independent of the ongoing work
- for just throwing away recent work that has gone into the wrong direction
- for looking up older implementations
- for freezing milestones

Lethal Running - a RPG about a deadly game show held in a futuristic dystopian society.
Offline Varkas
« Reply #20 - Posted 2015-03-20 15:09:45 »

Future: Make daily backups. Keep three stages of backups. Test the backups, they can become currupt, too. Yes, I'm doing this, since I lost a HD to to a hardware error. It happens.

Present: The key question is, are there still sectors on your HD containing the original, or recent file data, or were those overwritten? Restore Software onyl will try to restore the last version of the file, but there might be stray sectors with older versions. Unless you have some think like secure delete or such running. I'd say, if there are really months of work lost (and will need months to recreate), try this:

Create full image of the hard disk (e.g. with linux command dd (Disk Dump) and then search this image for fragments of the code which you can remember. If you are lucky, there is still something there. This will take less than some months, but it's tedious.

Problem: this image will require a HD larger than the original one to be kept and searched.

if (error) throw new Brick(); // Blog (german): http://gedankenweber.wordpress.com
Offline Cero
« Reply #21 - Posted 2015-03-20 17:55:28 »

Even as single developer, version control is invaluable.
- for tracking down bugs
- for developing features in separate branches
- for freezing published software and applying fixes independent of the ongoing work
- for just throwing away recent work that has gone into the wrong direction
- for looking up older implementations
- for freezing milestones

Yeah I can see that. but that implies a lot of skill, knowledge and experience with a version control system. I had so many conflicts and many times destroyed the whole repository that I just got burned too much to trust such a system. I do backup old versions of my code as zip files with time stamps. I wouldnt use branches because while someone skilled sees them as incredible useful, I only see them as adding a lot of risk.

So basically: If you are really good with those systems, I would agree.

Offline Abuse

JGO Ninja


Medals: 73


falling into the abyss of reality


« Reply #22 - Posted 2015-03-20 19:21:39 »

Are you sure the filesystem doesn't have a previous version of the file?

If the file has been on your harddrive for more than 24 hours, there should be a backup.
Offline CopyableCougar4
« Reply #23 - Posted 2015-03-20 19:31:22 »

Are you sure the filesystem doesn't have a previous version of the file?

Scroll up a few posts. Slyth found and recovered the file.

Well the nightmare is over!...

Either wandering the forum or programming. Most likely the latter Smiley

Github: http://github.com/CopyableCougar4
Offline richierich
« Reply #24 - Posted 2015-03-20 21:10:28 »

...version control...
If you are really good with those systems, I would agree.

It's a shame - VC is one of those funny things maybe you have to see in action (nothing fancy even, just basic usage) to understand the productivity improvement. It helps to be shown by work colleagues the basics of how to do it though - I think it's common for people to not get over that initial hump just working alone, and stick to big zip-ups. Definitely worth it once you "get it" though - I don't know if I could work without a repository now, it'd be like not having a debugger or something.

Maybe put it down as something to try again later if this latest scare hasn't forced you into it Cheesy
Offline Slyth2727
« Reply #25 - Posted 2015-03-20 21:20:48 »

Yeah fortunately I did find an exe and decompile it to get the base code. Unfortunately the variable names are crap but right now I'm trying to use the PDB to get them back as well. I now have everything backed up in the cloud and an external drive.
Offline jonjava
« Reply #26 - Posted 2015-03-21 04:55:10 »

Even as single developer, version control is invaluable.
- for tracking down bugs
- for developing features in separate branches
- for freezing published software and applying fixes independent of the ongoing work
- for just throwing away recent work that has gone into the wrong direction
- for looking up older implementations
- for freezing milestones

Yeah I can see that. but that implies a lot of skill, knowledge and experience with a version control system. I had so many conflicts and many times destroyed the whole repository that I just got burned too much to trust such a system. I do backup old versions of my code as zip files with time stamps. I wouldnt use branches because while someone skilled sees them as incredible useful, I only see them as adding a lot of risk.

So basically: If you are really good with those systems, I would agree.

1. "Implies a lot of skill" - No. The basics are simple as shit and already infinitely imporoves your workflow.
2. "Those systems" - No, we're not talking about 10 year old centralized SVN tomfoolery here.
3. "I had so many conflicts and many times destroyed the whole repository that I just got burned too much to trust such a system." - Tea, Rocket launchers and barbie dolls makes as much sense as what you just said.

Nobody cares what anyone uses personally - but please don't spread misinformation based on almost a decade old prejudiced experiences.

Throwing around tarballs was viable and even preferred well over half a decade ago but times have changed. And for the better, too. Sweet silky smooth baby jesus they have.

Offline Icecore
« Reply #27 - Posted 2015-03-21 08:45:58 »

I do backup old versions of my code as zip files with time stamps.

Lol i do same in past xD

and now i think that i can make from all this zips git rep ^^

"Implies a lot of skill"

Its only looks like that,  in Git technical you need 3 command main command:
Commit, pull, push + (some times git clone and git new rep)
That’s all)
I Use for win Tortoise git

Commits for local server ,so if you want: you even don’t need register something in internet simple local backup.

Yes if you fears corrupt files, zips with data better then Local corrupt rep.
But you can same zip copy of local rep)
And in one click make copy in internet

So with git you can faster find file history then using zip.

Last known State: Reassembled in Cyberspace
End Transmission....
..
.
Journey began Now)
Offline 65K
« Reply #28 - Posted 2015-03-21 11:07:35 »

It does take some effort to learn, respectively to master a tool like Git. As Linux originated tool it is a Geek tool. But you can start small with the basics and still benefit. Especially light weight branches are very nice, as my current use case shows:
One game character needs some AI tweaking, but I do not know if it can be achieved satisfactory. So, I created a new branch just for tweaking the Assassin character of Biodrone Battle. Still, I can work towards the game release uninfluenced by that. If I get it done, the AI changes will be merged into the main branch easily, if not, the branch gets deleted.

Lethal Running - a RPG about a deadly game show held in a futuristic dystopian society.
Offline Cero
« Reply #29 - Posted 2015-03-21 19:13:18 »

1. "Implies a lot of skill" - No. The basics are simple as shit and already infinitely imporoves your workflow.
2. "Those systems" - No, we're not talking about 10 year old centralized SVN tomfoolery here.
3. "I had so many conflicts and many times destroyed the whole repository that I just got burned too much to trust such a system." - Tea, Rocket launchers and barbie dolls makes as much sense as what you just said.

Nobody cares what anyone uses personally - but please don't spread misinformation based on almost a decade old prejudiced experiences.

Throwing around tarballs was viable and even preferred well over half a decade ago but times have changed. And for the better, too. Sweet silky smooth baby jesus they have.

I use Git at work. 2 years professional experience with it. I WOULD explain more in detail if you hadn't been so angry at someone talking about their opinion.
I didn't spread any misinformation, as I obviously stated "I got burned using it" as in MY experience and not gospel. I said "I dont use..." not "you shouldn't".
Also SVN sadly still seems to be industry standard, doesnt matter how old it is. Change takes time.


@Icecore:
Yeah a lot of the advantages 65K brought up do require branching. Which is where you can easily fuck up. Granted I always used command line since all the tools on mac cost money or confused me.

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