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  List of commercial games using Java?  (Read 32437 times)
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Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Posted 2004-01-11 17:30:53 »

Is there a list of (good :-) commercial games using Java? Thanks.

[Edit]
Currently the list is :

 ° All Cas' games, inluding  Revenge of the Titans (2010)
 ° Several commercial games using LWJGL (Lightweight Java Game Library)
 ° Bang
 ° Chrome (2003, Godgames)
 ° IL-2 Sturmovik (2001, Ubi-Soft)
 ° Law and Order (2002, Vivendi)
 ° Lux
 ° Majestic (2001, EA)
 ° Minecraft (2009)
 ° Poisonville (2010)
 ° Poxnora  
 ° Puzzle Pirates
 ° Roboforge
 ° Runescape, and about 30 other Jagex games
 ° Shadow Watch (2000, Red Storm Entertainment)
 ° Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six (1999, Red Storm)
 ° Tribal Trouble (2008?, Oddlabs)
 ° Tribal Trouble 2 (2011, Oddlabs & GameSamba)
 ° Vampire Masquerade (2000, Nihilistic)
 ° Wakfu
 ° Who wants to be a Millionaire (2000, Jellyvison)
 ° You don't know Jack

 ° Etc.
Offline kevglass

JGO Kernel


Medals: 120
Projects: 23
Exp: 18 years


Coder, Trainee Pixel Artist, Game Reviewer


« Reply #1 - Posted 2004-01-11 17:40:23 »

You can add Law & Order I think. It was developed using Java3D.

Kev

Offline Java Cool Dude

Senior Member




Java forever


« Reply #2 - Posted 2004-01-11 20:31:49 »

Vampire Masquerade Smiley
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #3 - Posted 2004-01-12 05:08:57 »

[Edit: List has been editied into the topic's start article]
Offline princec

JGO Kernel


Medals: 343
Projects: 3
Exp: 16 years


Eh? Who? What? ... Me?


« Reply #4 - Posted 2004-01-12 22:01:55 »

My game ain't made it to a box yet but it's pure* Java Cheesy

Cas Smiley

* as near as dammit

Offline Mojomonkey

Senior Member




ooh ooh eee eeee


« Reply #5 - Posted 2004-01-12 22:43:53 »

What did Rainbow Six use Java for?

Don't send a man to do a monkey's work.
Offline swpalmer

JGO Coder




Where's the Kaboom?


« Reply #6 - Posted 2004-01-12 22:50:54 »

Roboforge
You Don't Know Jack

Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #7 - Posted 2004-01-14 07:52:38 »

Quote
What did Rainbow Six use Java for?

http://www.gamasutra.com/features/20000121/upton_01.htm
Quote
Inverse was a great networking solution - for Java. Unfortunately, we wrote Rainbow Six in C++. Our initial research had suggested that mixing the two would be trivial. However, in practice the overhead involved in writing and debugging an application using two different languages at the same time was staggering. (..)
(As a side note, we did continue to use Inverse for our Java-based products: last year's Politika and this year's Ruthless.Com. The problems we faced didn't arise from the code itself, but from mixing the two development environments.)

That's 1999. Could such problems be solved today?
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #8 - Posted 2004-01-14 08:06:45 »

There's an outdated article on Gamasutra by Bernd Kreimeier (1999) witch quotes some "dirty Java" games, as well as tries to look at how to do JNI and such.

http://www.gamasutra.com/features/19990611/java_13.htm#quake3

I don't know if the article is good. I learned however that John Carmack considered using Java in IDs' game for quite some time but dissmissed it in the end for Quake3. Kreimeier writes:
Quote

John Carmack considered using Java in id's games for quite some time, ever since he announced that the company was leaning towards client-downloadable code for the Trinity project. "The QA game architecture so far has two separate binary .DLLs: one for the server-side game logic, and one for the client side presentation logic." (..) However, with the hacking attacks on Quake 2 servers in mind, Carmack states that, "While it was easiest to begin development like that, there are two crucial problems with shipping the game that way: security and portability. If we were willing to wed ourselves completely to the Windows platform, we might have pushed ahead, but I want Quake 3: Arena running on every platform that has hardware-accelerated OpenGL and an Internet connection."
(..)
His solution: "I had been working under the assumption that Java was the right way to go, but recently I reached a better conclusion. The programming language is interpreted ANSI C. The game will have an interpreter for a virtual RISC-like CPU."
(..)
The advantages of using a C or C++ subset for your VM are obvious when it comes to handling legacy code. Ironically, it was Java portability problems that led id to develop the Quake 3 custom VM. Sun's promise of "write once, run anywhere" did not hold for the Invocation API on important server platforms, so Carmack decided to abandon the embedded JVM he had planned to use. (..) "Having made the decision to do my own interpreter, I feel much more at ease not having to rely on anyone else's external code. When it comes around to the next development cycle, I will make the Java decision again." As for embedding: "We are still working with significant chunks of an existing code base. If I did want to go off and start fresh, I would likely try doing almost everything in Java."

(Highlighting by me.)

Does anybody know more about Carmack's sentences?
I suppose he didn't "go off and started fresh", or is it that Doom3 uses Java? ;-)  Doom4 maybe - when there's an OpenGL 2 binding for Java 1.6 ? ;-)
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #9 - Posted 2004-01-14 08:07:55 »

Hmm... did I start this discussion in the wrong thread? Would "Java.Net - Games General Discussions" be more adequate? If so - please move it, Admin. :-)
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline julian_cochran

Junior Newbie




Java games rock!


« Reply #10 - Posted 2004-08-10 17:02:10 »

Don't forget D-Zone II, still my favourite game. Wink

- Julian
Offline kevglass

JGO Kernel


Medals: 120
Projects: 23
Exp: 18 years


Coder, Trainee Pixel Artist, Game Reviewer


« Reply #11 - Posted 2004-08-10 17:11:20 »

Is D-Zone actually on sale yet?

Kev

Offline sillysoft

Junior Member


Projects: 1


Waaaaaaaaaaaah!


« Reply #12 - Posted 2005-06-04 19:36:57 »

Lux is a commercial game that is pure Java. It hasn't made it into a retail box yet, but it's been successful online so far...

Offline z.e.r.o

Junior Member




Java games rock!


« Reply #13 - Posted 2005-06-08 16:14:34 »

I think also the more recent LockOn Modern Air Combat is Java-Based like its cousin IL2

Matteo Anelli
.brain - http://www.dot-brain.com
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #14 - Posted 2010-10-25 10:46:06 »

Sorry, can't resist:

Quote
So currently the list reads (I'll try to update it):
Add:
° Minecraft

(Not strictly a CD/boxed game but it is a commercial game using Java and OpenGL...)

Its website states currently:
1 513 285 registered, 476 648 purchases

This is good.
Offline kappa
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 74
Projects: 15


★★★★★


« Reply #15 - Posted 2010-10-25 10:52:14 »

Wow, what an old thread to necro Smiley

Theres a lot more commercial java games these days but yeh Minecraft is probably the most successful indie game ever.
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #16 - Posted 2010-10-25 11:04:35 »

Wow, what an old thread to necro Smiley
Indeed! ;-)

Quote
Theres a lot more commercial java games these days
Well, they're only starting to reach my field of view, but I can say it's really nice to see!

Quote
but yeh Minecraft is probably the most successful indie game ever.
Yes, amazing.
Offline gouessej
« Reply #17 - Posted 2010-10-26 00:46:40 »

Poisonville (LWJGL) http://us.bigpoint.com/games/poisonville/
Wakfu (JOGL) http://www.wakfu.com/fr

Offline SwampChicken
« Reply #18 - Posted 2010-10-26 07:14:16 »

Runescape
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #19 - Posted 2010-10-26 12:27:20 »

Thanks, very nice. Edited into the old list article.
Offline pjt33
« Reply #20 - Posted 2010-10-29 20:31:02 »

Runescape
And about 30 other Jagex games.
Offline princec

JGO Kernel


Medals: 343
Projects: 3
Exp: 16 years


Eh? Who? What? ... Me?


« Reply #21 - Posted 2010-10-29 20:48:39 »

Lately Revenge of the Titans as well. Although that's under "Cas's games", but that doesn't help my search engine traffic Wink

Cas Smiley

Offline Groboclown
« Reply #22 - Posted 2010-10-29 23:25:59 »

Last time I checked, the Puzzle Pirates MMO was Java based.

Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
Projects: 11
Exp: 10 years


Game Engineer


« Reply #23 - Posted 2010-10-30 01:53:03 »

Last time I checked, the Puzzle Pirates MMO was Java based.
And so is Bang! Howdy, also by Three Rings.

See my work:
OTC Software
Offline Preston

Senior Member


Medals: 4



« Reply #24 - Posted 2010-10-30 09:19:23 »

Edited, inluding an extra mention of Cas' newest Titan game. :-)

When there's an URL to a game available, I'm happy to include it.
Offline bienator

Senior Member




OutOfCoffeeException


« Reply #25 - Posted 2010-10-30 14:53:31 »

didn't knew that Vampire: The Masquerade used a JVM for scripting. Was an awesome game back than.
http://www.gamecareerguide.biz/features/19990611/java_13.htm#vampire

Offline IntuitSea!

Senior Newbie





« Reply #26 - Posted 2010-10-30 18:41:34 »

I believe that there are some here you missed:

http://lwjgl.org/projects.php

-Amazing-
Offline pjt33
« Reply #27 - Posted 2010-10-30 21:55:46 »

When there's an URL to a game available, I'm happy to include it.
For RuneScape: http://www.runescape.com
For the "about 30 other Jagex games", http://www.funorb.com
Offline ChrisM

JGO Coder


Medals: 1
Projects: 1


END OF LINE.


« Reply #28 - Posted 2010-10-31 01:46:31 »

didn't knew that Vampire: The Masquerade used a JVM for scripting. Was an awesome game back than.
http://www.gamecareerguide.biz/features/19990611/java_13.htm#vampire

PRO-TIP:  It was the first consumer product to ever carry the Java Powered logo.  This was, in fact, my first corporate deal I did when I started focusing on games for Sun in late 1999/2000.



And here is Rob Huebner's Most-mortum on Vampire development ('effing SIGH!):

Quote
3. Using Java as a scripting engine.
We knew from the start that allowing the user community to edit the game was an important part of the design. After working in the first-person action-game market, we saw the benefits of supporting the user community and wanted to carry this idea over into role-playing games, where it is not the norm. A built-in scripting system makes a game engine much more extendable by fans. In Jedi Knight, we created our own customized game language called COG. Creating COG took a lot of effort from the development team; several months of work went into creating the compiler, testing the generated code, and implementing the run-time kernel used to execute the scripts. The end result was worth it, but it cost a lot in terms of time and resources to pull it off (for more about COG, see my article, "Adding Languages to Game Engines," September 1997).  wrote for GDC on why he used Java instead of C:

When starting Vampire, we looked for ways to incorporate a scripting engine more easily than creating our own from scratch yet again. There were several scripting systems we examined and tested. At about that time, another game development company, Rebel Boat Rocker software, was getting a lot of attention for its use of Java technology. After exchanging a few e-mails with lead programmer Billy Zelsnak, we decided to give Java a try. Up to this point I knew very little of Java, and had largely dismissed it as a language suitable only for making icons dance on a web page and the like.

After a crash course in Java, we did a few simple tests incorporating it into our game engine. It passed each one with flying colors. In a matter of a few weeks, we had solved the major challenges involved in interfacing a standard, freely distributable Java virtual machine to our 3D RPG engine. From that point on, the only maintenance required was to add new native functions to the scripting language, which we did whenever we added new engine functionality that we wanted exposed to the script writers. We also trained several designers in the use of the scripting language, and they started creating the hundreds of small scripts that would eventually drive the storyline of the game.

Ever since those initial tests, I kept waiting for the other shoe to drop, so to speak. I expected to come to work one day and find out that the Java thread was chewing up 100MB of RAM or eating 50 percent of the CPU time, but amazingly, the system was trouble-free throughout development and never became a significant resource drain. If for some reason we had hit a dead end with the Java system late in the project, it would have easily taken three to four months to get back on track using a different scripting technology. In the end, the gamble paid off. We saved months of programmer time that would have otherwise been devoted to creating a scripting environment, and the result was a system significantly more efficient and robust than any we could have created ourselves.

Link to article here: http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/3147/nihilistic_softwares_vampire_the_.php?print=1

Oh, and it didn't matter that I delivered this message to the higher ups in Sun at the time........Even showing them Cas's terrain generator that fit on a 1.44mb floppy....

Offline nonnus29

Senior Member




Giving Java a second chance after ludumdare fiasco


« Reply #29 - Posted 2010-10-31 03:29:41 »

Awesome story Chris, I always wondered what the 'inside' scoop was on that!
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