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  Lookign for members to make a team  (Read 5741 times)
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Offline Tweakdev

Junior Newbie





« Posted 2013-02-24 22:53:19 »

Hai there..

One week ago someone told me to get into a community, finish my projects and to make a TEAM. He told me with a team I would have exciting moments, lots of fun, debating, learn with them and many other things.
Even thought there's one of my sides that's afraid to do this, afraid of not accomplish what I wish or not being skilled enough.

This will be simple for fun, contests like One Game A Month or game jams, learning process, etc..

Library: Slick2D

Team members needed:

2 programmers -> Me & [Slot Open]
1 Sound Artist -> [Slot Open]
1 Pixel Artist -> [Slot Open]

Send me a message if you are interested.
Online HeroesGraveDev

JGO Kernel


Medals: 269
Projects: 11
Exp: 2 years


┬─┬ノ(ಠ_ಠノ)(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻


« Reply #1 - Posted 2013-02-25 05:05:50 »

Generally on this forum, most people don't like such teams because they attract n00bs.

Just look through the topics in the business & project discussion boards (and sub-boards) and you will find plenty of examples.

Never let 'anyone' join your team. Make them show what they can do, then decide whether to accept them or not. With programmers this is especially important, but most people think 'if they can program something then it's good enough'. Treat programmers like artists when setting up a team.

Secondly, just because this person told you to get into a community AND make a team, doesn't mean the two are related. It's much easier to work with people face-to-face when you are beginning, otherwise you get frustrated and give up.

Thirdly, I recommend entering the next Ludum Dare (in April). It's a really good time to see how well you work together as a team.

Offline ReBirth
« Reply #2 - Posted 2013-02-25 05:19:42 »

Even on my 2 persons team (me programmer and one artist slave) it's hard to manage sometimes.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline Jimmt
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 136
Projects: 4
Exp: 3 years



« Reply #3 - Posted 2013-02-25 05:28:50 »

Even on my 1 person team it's hard to manage sometimes.
Offline ReBirth
« Reply #4 - Posted 2013-02-25 05:38:34 »

Even on my 1 person team it's hard to manage sometimes.
Multiple personalities? Inconsistent work? Grin

Offline Jimmt
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 136
Projects: 4
Exp: 3 years



« Reply #5 - Posted 2013-02-25 06:05:28 »

Even on my 1 person team it's hard to manage sometimes.
Multiple personalities? Inconsistent work? Grin
Yes I partitioned my brain  Grin Inconsistent work is a problem for everyone though.
Offline Alan_W

JGO Knight


Medals: 8
Projects: 3


Java tames rock!


« Reply #6 - Posted 2013-02-25 06:25:23 »

Sadly, I'm not volunteering as I don't have the time to commit and so would be unreliable. There's plenty of programmers here, but not so much in the way of artists and musicians.  The hard part of team work is planning and communication.  Do some initial concept work before recruiting.  Split the job up into well defined packages.  Plan incremental development.  Hold regular team meetings via twitter or Skype.  It's also easier to get people when you have some concept work to show.  Also look at your potential team members work.

Time flies like a bird. Fruit flies like a banana.
Offline Damocles
« Reply #7 - Posted 2013-02-25 06:33:26 »

Quote
I decided to try and make one similar to Dig Dug ..

Dig Dug Youtube Link-> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrvmDJxq86I

You dont really need a team for this kind of game. Try to work on that first.
If its good, its much easier to show it others when you ask them to build a team (the have less "slots" open)

Offline Tweakdev

Junior Newbie





« Reply #8 - Posted 2013-02-25 07:23:45 »

HeroesGraveDev@ "It's much easier to work with people face-to-face.."

I've done plenty of college group projects and most of the times we don't agree with each other and there's some complications, but I can tell it's not easy to manage but it's also a challenge.

Sadly, I'm not volunteering as I don't have the time to commit and so would be unreliable. There's plenty of programmers here, but not so much in the way of artists and musicians.  The hard part of team work is planning and communication.  Do some initial concept work before recruiting.  Split the job up into well defined packages.  Plan incremental development.  Hold regular team meetings via twitter or Skype.  It's also easier to get people when you have some concept work to show.  Also look at your potential team members work.

I believe communication isn't a issue, so you are telling me it would be easier to get people by showing my work ?

Quote
I decided to try and make one similar to Dig Dug ..

Dig Dug Youtube Link-> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrvmDJxq86I

You dont really need a team for this kind of game. Try to work on that first.
If its good, its much easier to show it others when you ask them to build a team (the have less "slots" open)


That project I haven't quit but it's in stand by, I started a simple project 2 days ago to get familiar with Slick2D and it's  almost complete..
Offline StumpyStrust
« Reply #9 - Posted 2013-02-25 07:35:51 »

...communication is everything. It is probably second only to the game working. Hell, it is first because without it, the game won't work.

And yes if you want people to join a project gives us a better idea on what it is you are doing. Give us some screens/description so we can see if we would be able to help or not.  I know it is hard when most here can't draw crap but even place holder art will work as long as the idea gets across. You also will never find artist/sfx guys here as this is a programming forum.

I also, would never join a project using slick. Not that it is bad but it IS rather dead.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline ctomni231

JGO Wizard


Medals: 99
Projects: 1
Exp: 7 years


Not a glitch. Just have a lil' pixelexia...


« Reply #10 - Posted 2013-02-25 08:25:36 »

Well, gathering a team base isn't impossible, but it is just very challenging. It is rather easy to just jump on a forum and try to assemble a team, but I have some advice that will probably be very helpful in your quest.

What you are dealing with...

Programmers in general are pretty occupied people. We all have our own agendas and projects we are working on while battling the toils of real life. As such, if the project leader fails to get our attention with some good detailed documents, chances are, we aren't going to look his way. In order for a project leader to be successful in getting people to help, that person is going to have to put in some work.

The Quote...

"We are going to code for fun and learning."

That isn't going to cut it. We are already coding for those things in our spare time, so the project leader is going to have to get more savvy than that. People, but programmers especially, like order in the work we do. Disorder in work shows badly for interest in any project as far as programmers are concerned. So, in order to get these people, we have to bring our project to their level of thinking.

The idea...

All games start with an idea. The first step to try and consolidate your idea into one sentence. It can be something very simple like...

"I want to make a Pac-man game."

or something a little bit more abstract like...

"I want to make a game about space pirates harvesting planets from killer aliens."

The idea is the most important tool in the project leaders arsenal. It helps us tell others what the general focus of the project is going to be.

The technology..

After that, the next best course is to find the technology that would be best suited for hosting your game. (In this case, since your on a Java forum, I would think it would be Java.) However, you just scout around reviewing the different technologies available, and look for one that will allow you to complete your game. If the reasoning is simply because you want to know more about Slick2D, for instance... more power to you. (This section is also the place where you decide if you'd want to make a single-player or multi-player game.)

The detailed document..

The next step is to start charting out the details for the game in question. Usually, the best place to start charting this out is with simple sketches and a notepad. You want to start charting out the settings, the objects, and the statistics of how the objects are going to interact. After a while, you'll have a pretty large document of all the features planned for the game. The most important aspect of document writing is to be as detailed as possible. Try to get all the ideas planned and out there at once.

Trim down...

After this, you want to trim down the game into something a little bit more manageable. Try to get the game ideas all down to a few pages, and split up those into smaller chunks so you can create small levels and worlds in your game.

Try it...

Then, you start the coding process and use whatever placeholders you may find to start bringing your project to life. It doesn't necessarily have to be complete, but any little bit helps.

Marketing...

Now you are ready to market your idea out there for people to look at. Many people will look. Some might not give it a second look, others might pass it by, but there will always be a few onlookers looking at the project. Keep persistent at it and some people will look to help out if they see your effort is great enough.

tl:DR

Getting people to join up for anything is a lot of work on your part. The best way to learn about a programming language is to either go to a class, or just practice it yourself. Even though being in a group is an ideal working condition, it will add a whole new flurry of problems to the programming process.

However, just because it is hard, doesn't mean you should give up. The more work you show as a programmer with your ability, the more people will be drawn to your work. The key is to keep working toward your goal of getting a team. If you follow those steps above, it will help you get a better starting position on attracting programmers. (It should also help you attract artists and musicians as well, but just make sure that you post at a place where they would be abundant.)


Offline Damocles
« Reply #11 - Posted 2013-02-25 09:26:20 »

Quote
The most important aspect of document writing is to be as detailed as possible

That can be counter productive.
This approach works well with a business apllication that has a well defined set of functionalities.

But a game is only as good as the final product, and can not be estimated on paper.
Things might have to be changed a lot during devlopment.
Defining too much beforehand can end in inflexibility and frustration.

Its better to make a general overview, and then a prototype of the gameplay / Mockscreens.
Only if this prototype is fun, add the specific list of contents / assets / levels.

-> It boils down to be able to make protoypes and/or good mockscreens (if you are an artist)

Exception to that: If the game is in fact a clone (gameplaywise) the prototype can be the other game
to be copied.

Offline Tweakdev

Junior Newbie





« Reply #12 - Posted 2013-02-25 13:14:02 »

...communication is everything. It is probably second only to the game working. Hell, it is first because without it, the game won't work.

And yes if you want people to join a project gives us a better idea on what it is you are doing. Give us some screens/description so we can see if we would be able to help or not.  I know it is hard when most here can't draw crap but even place holder art will work as long as the idea gets across. You also will never find artist/sfx guys here as this is a programming forum.

I also, would never join a project using slick. Not that it is bad but it IS rather dead.

Slick2D it seems quite good, but are you sure it's dead ? One thing I believe some people might start to use it now, since a member of Mojang used it to develop a game for Humble Bundle.

thanks for everyone and specially to ctomni231@ .. I even talked to my programming teachers and they told me about the same, it's not easy to manage a team and there's many concepts in it. Tbh I lost motivation to continue my projects with all the answers but now, now I am feeling so motivated to finish the projects I have in stand-by.
I learned something with this post, thanks to everyone that advised me. I hope this topic can be used as reference to future people who try to form a team. Smiley
Offline Jimmt
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 136
Projects: 4
Exp: 3 years



« Reply #13 - Posted 2013-02-25 17:57:38 »

Slick isn't useless, just a bit outdated. We recommend libGDX for everything Smiley
Offline opiop65

JGO Kernel


Medals: 156
Projects: 7
Exp: 3 years


JumpButton Studios


« Reply #14 - Posted 2013-02-27 11:59:18 »

Why would people start to use it because a Mojang programmer used it? Slick has been used for years, I doubt its going to be popular all of a sudden just because a famous programmer used it. Also, why would you need a team for a game that is almost finished after 2 days? The game sounds like a side project for learning. Come back and ask for a team when you have a game that actually requires a team.

Offline wessles

JGO Wizard


Medals: 67
Projects: 4
Exp: 3 years


Profile picture isn't relevant.


« Reply #15 - Posted 2013-05-10 22:11:06 »

I would love to join, but I have another thread that is currently waiting for people to join. You can help me, If you want. For more info, just see this: http://www.java-gaming.org/topics/slick2d-indie-game-not-much-experience-needed/29539/view.html

Offline Jimmt
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 136
Projects: 4
Exp: 3 years



« Reply #16 - Posted 2013-05-10 23:53:04 »

Thread is outdated and the member is not active (hasn't been for 2+ months), like 99% of the rest of the threads in this section. Honestly, it's going to be very hard to find collaborators unless you have something to prove your programming skills and have been around for a while.
Offline alaslipknot
« Reply #17 - Posted 2013-05-11 02:16:57 »

Thread is outdated and the member is not active (hasn't been for 2+ months), like 99% of the rest of the threads in this section. Honestly, it's going to be very hard to find collaborators unless you have something to prove your programming skills and have been around for a while.

i think those two can be married one day (i hope he is not the same guy, am also seeing the other online and he didn't reply to his topic yet  Emo )

"It's not at all important to get it right the first time. It's vitally important to get it right the last time."
Online HeroesGraveDev

JGO Kernel


Medals: 269
Projects: 11
Exp: 2 years


┬─┬ノ(ಠ_ಠノ)(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻


« Reply #18 - Posted 2013-05-11 02:27:58 »

The other problem with these projects is that everyone wants to lead one and the only people that would be sensible enough to join an existing team project instead, wouldn't join because they're sensible enough not to.

In the rare event that someone is n00by enough to join a n00b project, they never get anything done.

As a result, this forum is full of projects that fail to even start.

Offline ReBirth
« Reply #19 - Posted 2013-05-11 10:48:13 »

I come here just because I forgot to give Jimmt a medal.

Offline Jimmt
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 136
Projects: 4
Exp: 3 years



« Reply #20 - Posted 2013-05-11 15:13:42 »

I come here just because I forgot to give Jimmt a medal.
Why thank you. Smiley
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