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  Applet's vs Applications  (Read 1179 times)
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Offline StonePickaxes

JGO Coder


Medals: 4
Projects: 2


Nathan Kramber


« Posted 2011-12-08 23:52:28 »

Which is better, and what is the real difference?

I've been debating which I want to program, and want to make an informed decision.

Check out my website!
Offline sproingie
« Reply #1 - Posted 2011-12-09 00:39:12 »

Start with applications, don't worry about applets or anything else on your roadmap til you've got the basics under your belt.
Offline ReBirth
« Reply #2 - Posted 2011-12-09 02:53:09 »

Applet can be an application and vice versa.

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Offline mlaux

Junior Member


Medals: 3



« Reply #3 - Posted 2011-12-09 05:13:46 »

It's pretty flexible to subclass Applet; as well as the usual applet behavior, you can always just throw it in a JFrame if you want to provide a windowed/downloadable version.

Offline Damocles
« Reply #4 - Posted 2011-12-09 08:32:15 »

You might have more fun with applets, as you can show your progress very quickly to others.
The downside is that its (a little) more work to pack and run them.
But doing these packing, running steps is a good training.

An important difference is that applets have tighter restrictions of what they are allowed to do.
But if you dont want to write files onto harddisk or open an online connection, you wont have to bother
about these restrictions too much.


Offline StonePickaxes

JGO Coder


Medals: 4
Projects: 2


Nathan Kramber


« Reply #5 - Posted 2011-12-09 14:45:03 »

Ok, awesome. Quick question, how does one go about saving a user's progress in an applet game if they can't access the hard disk? I've seen this done before and don't understand how it can be done.

Check out my website!
Offline kappa
« League of Dukes »

JGO Kernel


Medals: 70
Projects: 15


★★★★★


« Reply #6 - Posted 2011-12-09 14:47:38 »

Quick question, how does one go about saving a user's progress in an applet game if they can't access the hard disk? I've seen this done before and don't understand how it can be done.
Number of ways applets can save data, you can use Cookies, Muffins, Access any of the methods available to JavaScript (Cookies, HTML5 Storage, etc), Use PHP for serverside storage, etc.

HTML5 Storage via JavaScript is probably the nicest non server solutions atm (provided the browser supports it).
Offline gouessej

« In padded room »



TUER


« Reply #7 - Posted 2011-12-09 15:06:24 »

Hi

Which is better, and what is the real difference?

I've been debating which I want to program, and want to make an informed decision.
Applets are nice for the final users especially when they are unsigned, they have (almost) nothing to do but using them adds a non homogeneous "layer" : the web browser. It adds a variant. A given Java program can work on various combinations of operating systems, graphics cards, etc... Using web browsers adds another source of bugs too, look at bad support of applets on Chrome, the changes of the way to access to the OpenGL context in web browsers on Mac OS X... Therefore, maybe use applets only for a game using a few resources and not too much external libraries. Applets work better now than 5 years ago.

Applications are a bit heavier to install, you can use installers like GetDown (a lot of people here like it), IzPack (very professional but needs a real effort to create your own installer with it), Java Web Start (a bit buggy but extremely simple to use) or native installers. When your installer works fine, you will generally have less bugs than with applets because you don't really rely on the web browser except a very little bit for Java Web Start (Chrome adds a scary supplementary warning when the user clicks onto a JNLP link). Don't package your applications into a single downloadable JAR as WinZip might open it which is not what you want (Java Web Start is nice to work around this problem). In my humble opinion, Java Web Start is nice for games in beta version, people automatically get the updates, it is very simple. If it is not enough for you, when your game becomes more popular, switch to better installers. Of course, you have less restrictions when using an application.

You might have more fun with applets, as you can show your progress very quickly to others.
This is true for Java Web Start too.

Offline Damocles
« Reply #8 - Posted 2011-12-09 15:20:08 »

But JavaWebStart opens 3 additional Windows ("Open with", Webstartwindow, Downloadspopup, and possibly some securityquestion)
and needs 2 clicks.

An Applet you can start directly with 1 click on the linked page. (+1 for the security question if unsigned)

Thats quite a difference still.

Plus, weirdlooking popups scare every average user who is used to the seamless experience of Flash.

Offline gouessej

« In padded room »



TUER


« Reply #9 - Posted 2011-12-09 15:52:05 »

But JavaWebStart opens 3 additional Windows ("Open with", Webstartwindow, Downloadspopup, and possibly some securityquestion)
and needs 2 clicks.
When Java Web Start is used by default to open JNLP files, "Open With" does not appear. Therefore, when Java Web Start is used for unsigned applications, the user only has to click once on the link and once for all on "Open With", not twice for all Java Web Start applications. When the application has been successfully installed, the user only sees the progress bar when this application requires an update and this progress bar appears with a different look in applets. When avoiding applets, you avoid problems of the plugins for all browsers; maybe that's not your problem but it is a problem for programmers trying to provide cross-platform APIs running on all browsers and that is why I won't waste any time with applets even though they are fine for casual games.

An Applet you can start directly with 1 click on the linked page. (+1 for the security question if unsigned)

Thats quite a difference still.
There is just one more click. I don't say that there is no difference, I said you can show your progress quickly too with Java Web Start.

Plus, weirdlooking popups scare every average user who is used to the seamless experience of Flash.
The scary popup appears when using a signed applet too and it is possible to hide the big popup "Java starting". Please don't compare Java to Flash. Flash is almost unable to run a first person shooter without Alchemy (mixing C++ with Flash) even though Molehill will improve the situation... mainly on recent machines. Flash is fine for videos but it is not as reliable as Java especially not on Windows platforms.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline ReBirth
« Reply #10 - Posted 2011-12-10 06:35:20 »

For usage on this forum (showcase), you may wnat to stick on applet -since it's also good for java4k comp-

Offline Thomas.john179

Junior Newbie





« Reply #11 - Posted 2011-12-15 22:54:43 »

Personally I prefer JFrame because of the downloadable version of what you are working on. However I would say to start with Applications if I had to choose.
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