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  Eclipse vs. Netbeans  (Read 39926 times)
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Offline GabrielBailey74
« Reply #90 - Posted 2012-03-18 23:58:05 »

After a while (I'd say overnight? 18+ hours) of me programming in Eclipse, it starts to wack out, sucks up like 600,000k in my task manager, computer starts lagging, mouse sketches out.

Offline Riven
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« Reply #91 - Posted 2012-03-19 00:00:59 »

I'd argue that that's pretty acceptable after it allowed you to be productive for 18+ hours Smiley Just restart Eclipse and continue coding!

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Offline GabrielBailey74
« Reply #92 - Posted 2012-03-19 00:19:09 »

Lol, I'm a programmer for sure, nothing but back pain and energy drinks  Yawn.
Eclipse++ though, gets the job done, can't believe I use to HardCore program a rsps via NOTEPAD lol..

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Offline ra4king

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« Reply #93 - Posted 2012-03-19 00:38:51 »

- Import fixing is "smart" in Eclipse (and import code is nicely folded automatically). I don't need to select every time which conflicting class to import, since Eclipse generally remembers my last decision (whereas NetBeans doesn't seem to).
If you need to automatically import classes in Eclipse, Ctrl+Shift+O (O as in Orange) will automatically import all missing classes and format it all Smiley

NetBeans advantages:
- ...
- ...
- The file system is refreshed automatically; if I change my sprite sheet image I don't need to hit "F5" to refresh the project before compiling
- Renaming, say, a class or method is more intuitive and doesn't fail like it often does in Eclipse
1. You can set Eclipse to automatically refresh Eclipse and automatically detect when a file is removed/added. Window -> Preferences -> General -> Workspace -> check both "refresh ..." checkboxes
2. Renaming stuff in Eclipse has never failed for me and is just as intuitive as Netbeans, then again this is all a matter of opinion Tongue

Offline Jimmt
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« Reply #94 - Posted 2012-03-19 02:15:26 »

I've never used anything other than Netbeans (besides notepad++ and notepad Grin), so my opinion is biased. But I will say this: netbeans doesn't require you to build and then compile, it's all in one step, compared to eclipse(two steps)
Offline ra4king

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« Reply #95 - Posted 2012-03-19 02:16:47 »

I've never used anything other than Netbeans (besides notepad++ and notepad Grin), so my opinion is biased. But I will say this: netbeans doesn't require you to build and then compile, it's all in one step, compared to eclipse(two steps)
Hahahahaha then you've obviously never used Eclipse Grin Eclipse also automatically builds your project.

Seriously though, the differences between Eclipse and Netbeans are minuscule. It all ends being user preferences and what they first started out with/are more comfortable with.

Offline GabrielBailey74
« Reply #96 - Posted 2012-03-19 02:18:49 »

I've never used anything other than Netbeans (besides notepad++ and notepad Grin), so my opinion is biased. But I will say this: netbeans doesn't require you to build and then compile, it's all in one step, compared to eclipse(two steps)
Hahahahaha then you've obviously never used Eclipse Grin Eclipse also automatically builds your project.

Seriously though, the differences between Eclipse and Netbeans are minuscule. It all ends being user preferences and what they first started out with/are more comfortable with.

Amen, I hit run and in one press it's compiled + debugged + running ^.^.

Believe in Eclipse you can also debug your program live, like as it's running you can make changes to the code, save it, and the changes take effect (Assuming no errors).

Offline gimbal

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« Reply #97 - Posted 2012-03-19 11:57:52 »

Believe in Eclipse you can also debug your program live, like as it's running you can make changes to the code, save it, and the changes take effect (Assuming no errors).

That has little to do with Eclipse; that is built into the Java debugger services which can hot-swap code. The only thing you have to do is slap certain command line switches on there when running an application, which Eclipse does for you automatically when you start an application in debug mode. When you use Eclipse's build automatically feature, this will see the changes you make to source files automatically pop up in the running instance. Heck, when you have a break point on a certain method and you make changes to it, you'll see that the debugger automatically moves back to the start of the method.

Its pretty limited though, you can't hot-swap changes to the class structure for example. But it works quite neatly when you only make changes to the body of a method - a good reason to lay down a proper code design IMO Smiley
Offline gene9

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« Reply #98 - Posted 2012-03-19 17:06:51 »

Exporting JARs on compile (and includes proper class-path in manifest)

I'd argue that real production builds like this should be done completely outside the IDE by a build tool such as Maven or preferably Gradle. They should be configured by elegant hand-written (as opposed to generated) build and config files.

Changing the main class in Eclipse is quick and easy

I do this all the time in NetBeans/Eclipse/IntelliJ/Gradle and it's really simple everywhere.

Most of these items seem very subtle or trivial. The big differences between IDEs come when you try doing more specific than really general Java. For example, if you use an alt language, such as Scala, Python, Clojure, there is a much less even playing ground.
Offline Preston

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« Reply #99 - Posted 2012-03-21 09:55:36 »

I use both everyday.  I could live without either.  I also use VS and JEdit as needed.
Funny you mention Jedit. I use it every day and it's one of the smartest text editors I ever used (and I used a lot).

Using Netbeans I like, too. For example to program Swing GUI applications.
I can also edit, compile, run and debug the Java source code with Netbeans on HP UX machines for example, and out of the box -- i.e. the very same Netbeans ZIP archive I use on Linux and Windows. That's impressive not only for me, but also for the HP UX guys who're usually not familiar with good looking GUI programs let alone an IDE.
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Offline gimbal

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« Reply #100 - Posted 2012-03-21 13:51:10 »

I can also edit, compile, run and debug the Java source code with Netbeans on HP UX machines for example, and out of the box -- i.e. the very same Netbeans ZIP archive I use on Linux and Windows. That's impressive not only for me, but also for the HP UX guys who're usually not familiar with good looking GUI programs let alone an IDE.

Indeed, the way Swing is applied in Netbeans and the Netbeans platform is quite impressive. Its the one Java application I know that "just works" GUI-wise on all popular platforms (and as a result apps built with the Netbeans platform share the same sensation). And it probably required plenty of blood, sweat, tears and many hacks to get it to that point I'll bet Smiley Heck, it spawned a whole new LayoutManager in Java 6.

Not exactly lightweight material though, the initialization phase of a simple hello world thing can already take seconds. Such things are exactly the kind of cannon fodder (War! Never been so much fun!) that Java haters abuse :/ Power features such as the fact that you can hot-swap GUI changes directly into a running instance (god I love Java) is conveniently overlooked.
Offline gene9

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« Reply #101 - Posted 2012-03-22 18:59:16 »

Seriously though, the differences between Eclipse and Netbeans are minuscule. It all ends being user preferences and what they first started out with/are more comfortable with.

I completely disagree. The differences are huge.

For basic editing/running Java source code and integrating with a version control system, yes, they are fairly similar.

If you try to do Scala, Python, Kotlin, LaTeX, JavaFX, Gradle: there are really major differences in IDE support.
Offline gimbal

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« Reply #102 - Posted 2012-03-23 13:42:32 »

For basic editing/running Java source code and integrating with a version control system, yes, they are fairly similar.

If you try to do Scala, Python, Kotlin, LaTeX, JavaFX, Gradle: there are really major differences in IDE support.

I have to be pedantic and say that this is not the IDE but the plugins we're talking about. Basic out-of-the-box features for both Netbeans and Eclipse is the same when you pick a comparable download package. Eclipse seems to have more support from third parties and as such there are plugins available for it that you will not find for Netbeans - but they remain third party plugins and the experience is really varied I can honestly say. Especially the release management behind plugins can be terrible, the number of times I had one break after an update because it became incompatible with Eclipse WTP... grrrrr.
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