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  Eclipse vs. Netbeans  (Read 40266 times)
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Offline Roquen
« Reply #30 - Posted 2011-03-30 10:26:09 »

Eclipse is the official dev env. for Android as well.
Offline philfrei
« Reply #31 - Posted 2011-03-31 01:41:30 »

Another consideration is the support environment. I've gotten some excellent support on the Eclipse boards. But also, have needed it due to some of the complexities of trying to write a servlet code that also handles JDBC/database interaction. I made the mistake of trying to use a book based on NetBeans IDE for learning servlet writing. The folks at Eclipse helped me find tutorials that eventually allowed me to convert NetBeans WAR files to Eclipse format so I could use my book & examples after all. (Not an efficient way to learn servlets, believe me. If I could do it all over...)

When I was trying out NetBeans, I was kind of put off by the clutter and noise at the site, lots of tutorials with bad english, bad spelling. Lots of commercial offers intermixed. It's not terrible, but I prefer the calmer Eclipse environment. Some might call it sterile? Matter of taste.

Unless there is a definite, understood need that can only be addressed by one side, just flip a coin and you'll do fine. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buridan%27s_ass

The only problem I've had with editing in Eclipse is sometimes the dropdown list gets really slow (for the code helper). But if you check the Eclipse Forum, there are ways to deal with that.

"Greetings my friends! We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives!" -- The Amazing Criswell
Offline deepthought
« Reply #32 - Posted 2011-03-31 23:08:20 »

use them both equally. that way you won't feel totally overwhelmed as if you used one for a long time and decided to switch or try the other.

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Offline benc1213

Senior Newbie





« Reply #33 - Posted 2011-04-06 04:17:16 »

I have been using Eclipse starting out learning java and I like it so much that I haven't felt the need to try others.
Offline ra4king

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« Reply #34 - Posted 2011-04-06 05:25:31 »

I have installed and tried both, yet for some reason Eclipse appeals to me the most, so......Eclipse it is! Grin

Offline benc1213

Senior Newbie





« Reply #35 - Posted 2011-04-07 03:19:25 »

I finally gave netbeans a go and honestly I hate it. Everything feels clunky and unorganized. I like Eclipse so much more.
Offline ra4king

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« Reply #36 - Posted 2011-04-07 04:18:44 »

The only thing going for Netbeans is its profiler but honestly, that's only something I'll be using from time to time, so look and feel matters more Grin

Offline Riven
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« Reply #37 - Posted 2011-04-07 11:11:25 »

The profiler is separately available as 'VisualVM', which is included in the JDK.

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Offline ra4king

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« Reply #38 - Posted 2011-04-07 19:09:29 »

I have never of VisualVM. How do I use it?

Offline Riven
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« Reply #39 - Posted 2011-04-07 19:09:59 »

I have never of VisualVM. How do I use it?
Click it.

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Offline ra4king

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« Reply #40 - Posted 2011-04-07 19:35:23 »

I searched around and figured out where it is. Wow this is very nice! Thanks Smiley

Offline laxika

Junior Newbie





« Reply #41 - Posted 2011-04-07 19:56:50 »

Check both of it then choose.

I choosed Netbeans because I loved it much better for the first sight...
Offline gouessej
« Reply #42 - Posted 2011-04-12 13:26:25 »

Or use jvisualvm in command line.

Offline m77

« In padded room »

« Reply #43 - Posted 2011-05-18 21:27:00 »

my choice is NetBeans
but is only because of my graphical preferences without technical reasons
also for me made sense that that was officially supported by Sun IDE (download together with branches of Java SDK)
Offline krasse
« Reply #44 - Posted 2011-05-19 06:03:47 »

Are you on drugs???  Nothing NOTHING NOTHING completes with emacs. 

I agree. I have never completed anything with emacs Wink

Offline ra4king

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« Reply #45 - Posted 2011-05-19 10:36:28 »

Are you on drugs???  Nothing NOTHING NOTHING completes with emacs.

I agree. I have never completed anything with emacs Wink

Bahahah nice!! Smiley

Offline philfrei
« Reply #46 - Posted 2011-06-07 19:50:52 »

A friend just sent me this link. It is an interesting comparison of IntelliJ, Eclipse and NetBeans, as viewed from JVisualVM, a great profiling tool that comes free in the JDK.

http://java.dzone.com/articles/best-kept-secret-jdk-visualvm

"Greetings my friends! We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives!" -- The Amazing Criswell
Offline namrog84

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« Reply #47 - Posted 2011-06-08 17:28:46 »

Amateur/intermediate here.   I personally find benefit for them both.
Whenever I install on a new machine, I always install both netbeans and eclipse.

There are certain things in eclipse I can't just live without, that I am sure I could setup in Netbeans but haven't figured out how to yet.  Yet the same applies.

I usually don't use both on a single project. but alternate depending on the type of project I am planning on working on.


i.e. a newb tool: there is this auto complete thing that seems to work in eclipse that i can never get to behave similarly in netbeans. 

Also when something is wrong(red underline), netbeans requires alt enter? to display tools tips on what to do (i.e. import ____blah blah)


"Experience is what you get when you did not get what you wanted"
Offline u2d

Senior Newbie


Projects: 1



« Reply #48 - Posted 2011-06-10 03:00:59 »

Eclipse forever  Stare
Offline rshingleton

Innocent Bystander





« Reply #49 - Posted 2011-06-29 23:18:46 »


i.e. a newb tool: there is this auto complete thing that seems to work in eclipse that i can never get to behave similarly in netbeans.  

Also when something is wrong(red underline), netbeans requires alt enter? to display tools tips on what to do (i.e. import ____blah blah)


Auto complete:
  • Tools -> Options -> Code completion tab
  • Select java from the language drop down list
  • Put a check in the "Guess Filled Method Arguments" and "Auto Popup on Typing any Java Identifier Part"

Netbeans code errors:

Alt-enter will give you hints. You will also notice that on correctable errors such as missing imports there will be a lightbulb looking icon over by the line numbers. Hovering on this with the mouse will give you the same results and clicking on the icon will provide a list of options in a context menu. This allows you to fix mixxing imports for example.

I tend to learn keyboard shortcuts like:

  • ctrl-shift-i - fix/add all imports
  • alt-shift-f - format your code


I use these two shortcuts so much I find myself trying to use them in other programs like MS-Word.

As for which IDE is better, personally I stick with Netbeans, but I do mostly web application development and database integration work.

  • I've found that Netbeans tends to be much more stable, especially in a Windows environment.
  • Though it lacks in plugins, I've found that plugins that are there, at least to me seem easier to use.
  • The base/generic project structures in Netbeans seem to me more logically structured and easier to navigate.

Every other month or so I tend to fire up Eclipse because I think that I'm determined to switch due to an issue with Netbeans. After about half a day of tooling around I realize that converting all my existing projects and learning the ins and outs is just not worth my time.
Offline gimbal

JGO Knight


Medals: 25



« Reply #50 - Posted 2011-07-07 08:29:04 »

I use both. I use Eclipse for enterprise development (because my friends at JBoss have some nice plugins that make my life so much easier) and I use Netbeans for "most of anything else". As an actual tool I prefer Netbeans as it gets the spit-shine finish, Eclipse is a little rough around the edges and quirky. Getting better though!

There really is not one tool to do all jobs, I am happy using a specific IDE for a specific project.
Offline deepthought
« Reply #51 - Posted 2011-07-08 14:43:10 »

use Jcreator for a while.in a few days you will go crazy and download anything but jcreator. use whichever downloads faster or what you chance upon first.you will end up staying with it.

jocks rule the highschools. GEEKS RULE THE WORLD MWAHAHAHA!!
captain failure test game
Offline static_flashlight

Senior Newbie




Software Engineer


« Reply #52 - Posted 2011-07-10 00:16:59 »

The choice of IDE's really comes down to personal choice.  I do all my game development on a Linux netbook, and I've noticed that Eclipse preforms far better than Netbeans.  Netbeans is suppose to have a nifty Swing designer for fast GUI apps, but it always seemed kinda clumsy.
Offline Captain Awesome

Junior Member


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Hi


« Reply #53 - Posted 2011-07-10 07:54:03 »

The choice of IDE's really comes down to personal choice.  I do all my game development on a Linux netbook, and I've noticed that Eclipse preforms far better than Netbeans.  Netbeans is suppose to have a nifty Swing designer for fast GUI apps, but it always seemed kinda clumsy.

On my netbook it's the opposite: eclipse is slow while netbeans is much faster  Grin
Offline static_flashlight

Senior Newbie




Software Engineer


« Reply #54 - Posted 2011-07-11 00:10:09 »

Awesome to know other people get a kick out of java development on netbooks!
Offline ChexWithRaisins

Senior Newbie


Projects: 1


SphereCCG.com


« Reply #55 - Posted 2012-03-08 03:37:10 »

A number of the replies in this thread suggest that Eclipse is buggy.  I have primarily used Netbeans and tend to favor it, however it is not bug/issue free.  My Netbeans cache gets corrupted and must be deleted several times a week.  I've also had so weird issues with refactoring files.

Even so I still prefer Netbeans, the layout is so much more intuitive and it's not "information overload" that Eclipse seems to be when I use it.

Help Beta test SphereCCG!
Offline UprightPath
« Reply #56 - Posted 2012-03-08 03:50:19 »

Ah, about refactoring files and the like? It's probably not NetBeans or Eclipse or anything like that.

Any operation that creates a temporary file to store information is susceptible to program conflicts. I kept having some really bad issues with this after I got a new AV/Security program on my desktop. It has a system that scans any file created on the computer and locking it as soon as it's created. This caused me so many issues whenever I was doing a lot of things. In fact, before I found out about this issue I was almost completely against several IDEs, Database Software and installer companies.

If any of the issues are with permissions/processes, it's not the IDE, it's probably something else. Cheesy

On a side note? Netbeans. Netbeans. Netbeans. I used BlueJ, then Eclipse and then moved to Netbeans. I don't know why, but Eclipse is just bleh to me. The only thing I enjoyed about it was the fact that you don't have to write a build-for-store yourself to get it to generate a .jar with inner libraries. xD

Offline RylandAlmanza

Junior Member


Medals: 3



« Reply #57 - Posted 2012-03-08 05:31:04 »

REAL programmers use butterflies!
http://xkcd.com/378/
Offline CommanderKeith
« Reply #58 - Posted 2012-03-08 07:35:27 »

(...) and ease of use (...)
You must be kidding!? I used all three and while I don't argue about all the other aspects of them, prefering Eclipse over others because of it's ease of use is beyond my understanding  Shocked
I agree, when I try to do something simple in eclipse like add a jar to the classpath in a project, I right click the project and a huge list of options are shown, most of which look completely useless. Netbeans isn't so bloated. Also, if a feature/add-on is present in netbeans, you can be guaranteed that it works and is supported. But eclipse add-ons are often buggy and incomplete.

One thing I dislike about all IDE's is their reliance on Ant and/or Maven. Stuff like compiling and updating a project should be written in java, there shouldn't be sub-languages that have to be learned.

Offline princec

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« Reply #59 - Posted 2012-03-08 08:40:54 »

By and large, Eclipse (and probably Netbeans, I wouldn't know for sure) take care of automatically building everything for you. You use Ant generally for the packaging sort of stage, and deployment, and distribution. When you're just hacking on stuff the built-in function in Eclipse does it all.

Cas Smiley

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