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  Motivation?  (Read 3084 times)
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Offline appel

JGO Wizard


Medals: 50
Projects: 4


I always win!


« Posted 2010-08-05 20:57:12 »

What drives motivation?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc&feature=player_embedded

Check out the 4K competition @ www.java4k.com
Check out GAMADU (my own site) @ http://gamadu.com/
Offline h3ckboy

JGO Coder


Medals: 5



« Reply #1 - Posted 2010-08-05 22:03:36 »

wow, that is extremely interesting, thanks for sharing!!
Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
Projects: 11


Game Engineer


« Reply #2 - Posted 2010-08-05 22:58:26 »

Great video. Too bad most bosses/companies don't seem to get this concept.

See my work:
OTC Software
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #3 - Posted 2010-08-06 20:36:36 »

Nice video, and that seems to show something I've been fortinute to see in all the places I've worked. Responsibility driven management where I'm responsible for getting my work done in any way I like it. I think what's really good about this is that I care more if it all goes wrong.

But I still think balance is key. I've seen (and heard) stories of workplaces which are more like social groups. People come in, chat, mess around, take a long lunch and ultimately just get nothing done. So sometimes you need managers to lean over you and shout down that you need to get to work!

Offline DzzD
« Reply #4 - Posted 2010-08-06 23:40:29 »

But I still think balance is key. I've seen (and heard) stories of workplaces which are more like social groups. People come in, chat, mess around, take a long lunch and ultimately just get nothing done. So sometimes you need managers to lean over you and shout down that you need to get to work!
IMHO, usually if people chat/mess around too much or do nothing that's because they dont really have pleasure in their work or need to have some rest or have personal problems but rarely because they want to hurt the company they work for. solution is often to find why and if they really dont like what they do, to find them another task that they will enjoy more rather than trying to force them to work on something they dislike.

Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
Projects: 11


Game Engineer


« Reply #5 - Posted 2010-08-06 23:56:03 »

IMHO, usually if people chat/mess around too much or do nothing that's because they dont really have pleasure in their work or need to have some rest or have personal problems but rarely because they want to hurt the company they work for. solution is often to find why and if they really dont like what they do, to find them another task that they will enjoy more rather than trying to force them to work on something they dislike.
Agreed. If I'm doing something I like then I work incredibly quickly and don't mind long hours or low pay (as much). If I'm working on something I don't like then I dislike my job and just want to leave and/or slack off. Smiley

See my work:
OTC Software
Offline RoryFenrir

Innocent Bystander





« Reply #6 - Posted 2010-12-04 02:18:49 »

Very interesting video, and indeed motivational!  I think it is awesome that some businesses are working away from direct monetary systems of incentive.  I have not actually been at a work place, but I can see the damage that mass capitalism and competition can cause in the world.  These concepts are very socialistic, but that definitely is not a bad thing at all.

I hope that once I am out of University I can find a place like this to work!


But I still think balance is key. I've seen (and heard) stories of workplaces which are more like social groups. People come in, chat, mess around, take a long lunch and ultimately just get nothing done. So sometimes you need managers to lean over you and shout down that you need to get to work!

I guess there will always be people taking advantage of the ideal system, but I am sure that these people would get sifted out by upper management...

Going to school for Computer Science combined with Visual Art, Welding to Game Making?  I think so.
Offline avm1979
« Reply #7 - Posted 2010-12-13 05:00:53 »

Interesting video - but I don't think they answered the big question raised at the beginning, and that I thought was the most insightful observation of the whole thing - why is it that more money actually produced poorer performance, and only for cognitive tasks to boot?

Taking that at face value, you might even say - to improve the quality of work at your company, pay people less, and forget the mastery/purpose/control stuff.

Offline krasse
« Reply #8 - Posted 2010-12-13 09:30:11 »

Love this video! Thanks for sharing!

Offline fireside

Senior Newbie





« Reply #9 - Posted 2010-12-13 12:44:41 »

This is just Maslow's hierarchy of needs.  Also, we're all different so one thing doesn't necessarily work for everyone exactly the same way.  The tests were kind of ambiguous.  Some of us want to play guitar, some draw, some write programs, some do all, so even knowing this, it's still hard to get people functioning in a certain way that benefits a company.  I say company because that's where the financial rewards come into play, but companies that understand this and tap into it are going to do better.  Even unskilled factory workers can be given more autonomy and creativity and they will work better and be happier.   Although there was this implied socialistic behavior,  I think the company starters are generally people who need autonomy and creativity, so it's really why capitalism works better as a system.  Socialism claims to reward by need, but generally leads to stagnation because it's even a higher top down management system with more rules and regulations.  I think the really depressing thing about this is that it's well known, but hardly used by management because at the end of the day, people like iron fisted control.  They forgot to do a test on what motivates management and it's usually the desire to control others.
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