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  Which win7 should i buy?  (Read 3803 times)
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Offline Mads

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One for all!


« Posted 2010-06-03 16:49:34 »

Hello.

I need to buy windows 7, because my licence does not work anymore (got it through my fathers work).
Right now I use windows 7 ultimate, and I am very satisfied with that because of the small things such as having more icons on your desktop.

But win7 ultimate costs alot compared to home basic for example.


Which of the editions should i buy - does it really make that much of a difference? 

Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #1 - Posted 2010-06-03 17:49:28 »

You can find differences between the versions here. But IMHO unless you want XP mode, then just go with Home Premium.

Offline Eli Delventhal

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« Reply #2 - Posted 2010-06-03 18:45:37 »

Try Mac OS 7.

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Offline elias4444

Junior Member





« Reply #3 - Posted 2010-06-03 19:18:36 »

Depending on your hardware, you may want to go 64-bit as well. I tried Win7 32-bit and was hugely annoyed by it's 2gb ram cap. I switched to 64-bit and am much happier now.

Of course, I really only use my Win7 partition for playing games and testing my own. I generally stick to OSX for everything else. Naturally, this may not be an option for you however.

Offline Riven
« League of Dukes »

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« Reply #4 - Posted 2010-06-03 19:21:48 »

Try Mac OS 7.

No, try MS-DOS from a bunch of floppies, and then buy Windows 7 Home Premium.



Masochist, why do you seem so eager to give Microsoft your hard earned money? Install Linux/Ubuntu, and if you don't like it, then buy Windows 7. Never give your money to Apple, they gave vendor-lockin a brand new meaning.

*RUNS*

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Offline bienator

Senior Member




OutOfCoffeeException


« Reply #5 - Posted 2010-06-03 19:47:57 »

Masochist, why do you seem so eager to give Microsoft your hard earned money? Install Linux/Ubuntu, and if you don't like it, then buy Windows 7. Never give your money to Apple, they gave vendor-lockin a brand new meaning.

*RUNS*
no reason to run away, you just stated the facts.

Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #6 - Posted 2010-06-04 03:13:34 »

I just want to note that he asked for what version of Windows 7 he should buy, not what Linux distro or version of Mac OS. Lets not turn this topic into an OS war.

Depending on your hardware, you may want to go 64-bit as well. I tried Win7 32-bit and was hugely annoyed by it's 2gb ram cap. I switched to 64-bit and am much happier now.
The 2gb cap is only with Windows 7 Starter, the lowest version for low-end hardware and emerging markets. All of the other 32-bit versions allow up to 4gb of ram, although typically you will only get about 3.2gb as much of the address space is used for other things. You can see more here.

If your PC can be upgraded to hold more then 4gb of ram, then I'd also recommend 64-bit. Simply because there is simple very little reason not to. But in my experience the majority of users don't need more then 4gb of ram (unless your running FireFox /joke).

Offline Nate

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Esoteric Software


« Reply #7 - Posted 2010-06-04 04:41:48 »

BitTorrent FTW :p

Offline Jono
« Reply #8 - Posted 2010-06-04 10:51:25 »

No, try MS-DOS from a bunch of floppies, and then buy Windows 7 Home Premium. install it with cygwin so you can run Wine.

Fixed that for you.
Offline Eli Delventhal

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Medals: 42
Projects: 11
Exp: 10 years


Game Engineer


« Reply #9 - Posted 2010-06-04 22:55:06 »

No, try MS-DOS from a bunch of floppies, and then buy Windows 7 Home Premium.



Masochist, why do you seem so eager to give Microsoft your hard earned money? Install Linux/Ubuntu, and if you don't like it, then buy Windows 7. Never give your money to Apple, they gave vendor-lockin a brand new meaning.

*RUNS*
RAR RAR *froth.*

See my work:
OTC Software
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline elias4444

Junior Member





« Reply #10 - Posted 2010-06-05 05:07:38 »

Quote
The 2gb cap is only with Windows 7 Starter, the lowest version for low-end hardware and emerging markets. All of the other 32-bit versions allow up to 4gb of ram, although typically you will only get about 3.2gb as much of the address space is used for other things.
It's interesting that Microsoft says what they do. All I know is that when i run Windows 7 32-bit Professional, for my memory it says "4gb (2gb usable)," and the hard-drive thrashing and terrible performance would seem to agree. If I switch to 64-bit, all the bells and whistles suddenly light up and are usable.

Offline Orangy Tang

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Monkey for a head


« Reply #11 - Posted 2010-06-05 12:09:51 »

It's interesting that Microsoft says what they do. All I know is that when i run Windows 7 32-bit Professional, for my memory it says "4gb (2gb usable)," and the hard-drive thrashing and terrible performance would seem to agree. If I switch to 64-bit, all the bells and whistles suddenly light up and are usable.

IIRC that's a limitation of some motherboards (typically the early 64bit ones where 32bit compatibility was still a bit ropey).

[ TriangularPixels.com - Play Growth Spurt, Rescue Squad and Snowman Village ] [ Rebirth - game resource library ]
Offline elias4444

Junior Member





« Reply #12 - Posted 2010-06-05 17:50:04 »

That would make sense, as I'm on an "older" 2006 Mac Pro. Funny that Apple supports 32-bit Win 7 on it and not 64-bit though (I had to do the installer work-around trick to get 64-bit on here).

Anyway... sounds like my initial point is valid though: depends on your hardware.  Wink

Offline xinaesthetic

Senior Member


Medals: 1



« Reply #13 - Posted 2010-06-06 19:57:46 »

Try Mac OS 7.  After about 30mins trying to set up a modern java development environment and anything else you might want to use your computer for, you'll think a brain tumour's a birthday present.
Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
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« Reply #14 - Posted 2010-06-08 18:48:19 »

Try Mac OS 7.  After about 30mins trying to set up a modern java development environment and anything else you might want to use your computer for, you'll think a brain tumour's a birthday present.
Cheesy

Yes, but you can play so many awesome classic games on it. Smiley

See my work:
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Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #15 - Posted 2010-06-08 20:13:30 »

Cheesy

Yes, but you can play so many awesome classic games on it. Smiley
Don't use the games card, even as a joke. Currently more games for the Mac then ever before, but it's nothing compared to the number of titles on Windowz.

Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
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« Reply #16 - Posted 2010-06-09 04:19:25 »

Don't use the games card, even as a joke. Currently more games for the Mac then ever before, but it's nothing compared to the number of titles on Windowz.
It's not meant as a joke. I grew up on Mac, so these are the games I played as a kid. They still feel so much better than the majority of modern games. I loves them. Mac had a far better shareware following during the Mac OS 7 days, which is what I played. Many of the modern indie game vets were Mac shareware devs back in the day.

But I admit, DosBOX I also have installed for classic games (as it has more games available), but I didn't grow up with most of these so they're not as meaningful to me.

See my work:
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Offline OverKill

Junior Member




Java games rock!


« Reply #17 - Posted 2010-06-09 09:51:49 »

@Topic:
Can you get one with an academic license?
Though as others have said, you should really contemplate what you need.

Otherwise, and I am just saying this because I find the Windows packaging scheme idiotic: Maybe you can really consider a different OS.
Heck, you could get a minimal Win7 for games and like but do your work on a dual-booted Linux install.
You could even virtualize the bought Win7 inside of the Linux install.

@OS war:
I also grew up with Apple, but won't touch their products any more. Not because of hw/sw, but because of their politics.
Not to mention OS-X IS some kind of derivative of a *nix derivative.

I personally would recommend GNU/Linux to anyone that does not have really special requirements.
And since Ubuntu does not have 'an Office', they shy away from it.
Most of the time people only look for products, not needs.
ala 'You don't need Word, you need a word processor.'
Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #18 - Posted 2010-06-09 21:39:31 »

Can you get one with an academic license?
Yes you can. Lots of universities are signed up to the MSDNAA allowing you to receive 100s of copies of commercial Microsoft software for free. Pretty much every piece of software they make, except the main Office apps, is on there. Typically with most versions. I even have less known stuff like Windows Server for High Performance Computing and XP Embedded.

As a student this is one great thing about MS, the tonnes of software they give us. For example the only thing I've ever received from Sun was an out of date copy of OpenSolaris (which is free anyway).

Offline Mads

JGO Ninja


Medals: 26
Projects: 3
Exp: 6 years


One for all!


« Reply #19 - Posted 2010-06-09 22:30:08 »

The reason i want win7, more than ubuntu and mac is because of software.
I like 3D production and video editing, and my software for that doesnt run on Ubuntu, or Mac.

Thanks for the link to compare Wink

Offline OverKill

Junior Member




Java games rock!


« Reply #20 - Posted 2010-06-10 09:41:13 »

The reason i want win7, more than ubuntu and mac is because of software.
I like 3D production and video editing, and my software for that doesnt run on Ubuntu, or Mac.
This is *exactly* what I ment. You are looking to run your software on a GNU/Linux.
Unless you *really* need *exactly* that, then it might run under wine.

BUT

there are tons of replacements for everything.
3D: Maybe Blender
Video Editing: Kino, Avidemux?

Maybe not as perfect as a commercial product, but 99% free.

So instead of trying to see if your software runs under Linux, see what Linux OS provides you with software to fulfil your requirements.
Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
Projects: 11
Exp: 10 years


Game Engineer


« Reply #21 - Posted 2010-06-10 18:39:56 »

For the record, my Mac OS 7 reference was meant only as a joke. I didn't intend to start an OS war.

I think Windows 7 finally looks like a modern Windows OS, so that's good. If I were a Windows user, I would likely obtain it.

See my work:
OTC Software
Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #22 - Posted 2010-06-11 00:43:09 »

This is *exactly* what I ment. You are looking to run your software on a GNU/Linux.
Unless you *really* need *exactly* that, then it might run under wine.
It's always seemed a bit pointless to me to install Linux just to use Wine, when you might as well just use Windows instead.

Offline OverKill

Junior Member




Java games rock!


« Reply #23 - Posted 2010-06-11 09:24:53 »

It's always seemed a bit pointless to me to install Linux just to use Wine, when you might as well just use Windows instead.
Well, not really, because many people prefer the Linux OS but do want to play a game or have very specific Software they need to run.
In such cases you can either resort to Wine or virtualization.

I made the final switch @home about 4 years ago and have never looked back. Basically you have everything you need (often just named differently) plus a lot more.
Funny thing with Linux is, you actually have sooo many choices, it is hard to decide what to take. Gnome/KDE/XFCE/LXDE just to name a few desktops.
Stuff like tilda I have yet to see for a Windows.

I'm not trying to convert you or anything. Just trying to show there are alternatives.
Online Roquen
« Reply #24 - Posted 2010-06-11 10:13:17 »

If you need to run windows then I'd suggest having windows installed as the native OS.  Then install virtualbox and have all other OSes run inside that.  The trick here is that I don't know where they are at with native OpenGL support in guest systems.  Otherwise guest systems run at almost 100% of the speed they would as a native OS (in my experience).

As an aside:  Realistically most open-source software doesn't stand-up to top tier com. software.

Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #25 - Posted 2010-06-11 11:10:04 »

Well, not really, because many people prefer the Linux OS but do want to play a game or have very specific Software they need to run.
In such cases you can either resort to Wine or virtualization.

I made the final switch @home about 4 years ago and have never looked back. Basically you have everything you need (often just named differently) plus a lot more.
Funny thing with Linux is, you actually have sooo many choices, it is hard to decide what to take. Gnome/KDE/XFCE/LXDE just to name a few desktops.
Stuff like tilda I have yet to see for a Windows.

I'm not trying to convert you or anything. Just trying to show there are alternatives.
I'd be pretty confident that there are more applications produced for Windows each year then for Linux, so I'd argue Linux actually has less choice. There are ports of Gnome and KDE for Windows (and others) for a full change from Explorer, plus tonnes of explorer shell plugins and minor replacements. For example I recently started using VistaSwitcher instead of the standard Windows alt+tab. You can even get the Linux-classic of multiple desktops on a 3D cube (multiple apps exist for this on Windows).

I've used Linux a lot in the past; but the bugs, bad hardware support, lack of software (and I'm referring to the software I wanted to use as the alternatives weren't as good) and yet more bugs always drove me back to Windows. Even just setting up multiple monitors can be a hassle, an area where Windows has had excellent support for years. It has been a very long time since I've had to spend over an hour fixing an issue with Windows, where as for me personally it was at least weekly with Linux.

If you need to run windows then I'd suggest having windows installed as the native OS.  Then install virtualbox and have all other OSes run inside that.  The trick here is that I don't know where they are at with native OpenGL support in guest systems.  Otherwise guest systems run at almost 100% of the speed they would as a native OS (in my experience).
VirtualBox has native graphics card support.

As an aside:  Realistically most open-source software doesn't stand-up to top tier com. software.
Seconded.

Online Roquen
« Reply #26 - Posted 2010-06-11 14:27:43 »

The 3D acceleration is still experimental and I have no idea how well it works.
Offline OverKill

Junior Member




Java games rock!


« Reply #27 - Posted 2010-06-11 15:48:46 »

@JL235:
I have had less problems with HW under Linux then with Windows.
Dual monitor with Linux was basically just as easy as under Windows.
Not to mention the spanning mode issues under Vista and 7.

Though I find it funny when people reduce Linux because of bugs, yet ignore the same problems on Windows.

Bugs exist everywhere.
With Linux I am unhappy because it has bugs.
Under Windows I'd be pi$$ed that I also payed money for it!! Wink

@Open Source Software
Depends. If you have a Software with massive amount of interest, say Paintshop, then yeah, it will naturally be better.
But on the other hand you have stuff that are either a niece product or just own the 'market'.
f.i. appservers, webservers etc.

Though I'd exclude any OpenSource software from the list for Windows. If you use Windows (also OSX) you should pay for everything you use.

@Amount:
Dunno if there are more, but I have found a lot more stuff for Linux then I have found for Windows.
Sure, you can find 6285 chat clients or 957354 things that will add another icon to your task bar.

I use Windows at work but hardly install anything because most come with a license requiring a purchase, even for the most simplest of stuff.
So I basically switched my actual work machine @ work to Linux and have not missed anything.

Don't take it personal. I intend no hostilities.
Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #28 - Posted 2010-06-11 17:19:11 »

The 3D acceleration is still experimental and I have no idea how well it works.
I tried it about 9 months ago and it worked (and worked well), but caused Windows to become unbootable after a restart (system restore solved the issue). I was running it on Windows 7 and at the time I don't believe it was officially supported. Hoperfully they have newer drivers now.

Though I find it funny when people reduce Linux because of bugs, yet ignore the same problems on Windows.
Quote
I didn't say there were no issues on Windows. I said that for me I encountered far worse on Linux. Tbh if all the software I had been running was more stable then I'd probably still be running Linux. When it works it is great, but it was a very long list of issues. There are some awesome open source apps out there like FireFox and Gimp (I'm using both right now). But the sad fact is that there is quite a lot of really buggy open source software out there. This is a huge pain when you just want to get stuff done.

I use Windows at work but hardly install anything because most come with a license requiring a purchase, even for the most simplest of stuff.
So I basically switched my actual work machine @ work to Linux and have not missed anything.
I'd put good money down that a good number of the popular free apps your using are available for Windows too. I used to use loads of open software where I previously worked, and still do at home.

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