Java-Gaming.org    
Featured games (81)
games approved by the League of Dukes
Games in Showcase (494)
Games in Android Showcase (113)
games submitted by our members
Games in WIP (562)
games currently in development
News: Read the Java Gaming Resources, or peek at the official Java tutorials
 
    Home     Help   Search   Login   Register   
Pages: [1]
  ignore  |  Print  
  How can I practice my Java skills?  (Read 1746 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Offline yhsa2nd

Innocent Bystander





« Posted 2009-08-17 04:42:32 »

I have the basics down, but how do I practice? I dont have any basic projects im willing to practice or work on, most of the projects I try to do end up being too hard and I can never finish them... What should I do?
Offline DMastaGX

Senior Newbie





« Reply #1 - Posted 2009-08-17 05:17:03 »

Learn more advanced topics like threads,networking,servelts and so on...
Offline shatterblast

Senior Newbie




Noobier Than Thou


« Reply #2 - Posted 2009-08-17 07:30:11 »

I have the basics down, but how do I practice? I dont have any basic projects im willing to practice or work on, most of the projects I try to do end up being too hard and I can never finish them... What should I do?

Start with something you like first until you find something you enjoy.  At that point, you will have something comfortable to you.  You can then proceed to build upon your previous successes, merging them into a single project.  Join communities that share your interests.  Play games.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline pjt33
« Reply #3 - Posted 2009-08-17 08:41:33 »

I have the basics down, but how do I practice? I dont have any basic projects im willing to practice or work on, most of the projects I try to do end up being too hard and I can never finish them... What should I do?
Check out the Java4k competition. Find a game you enjoy. Write a clone. Nearly all of the games on there are pretty basic if you're not worried about the 4k limit. (Left4kDead is probably the biggest exception, although if you don't worry about the lighting to start with then it's not very hard).
Offline JL235

JGO Coder


Medals: 10



« Reply #4 - Posted 2009-08-17 14:25:02 »

Try to plan your projects with the aim to better identify those sections that you think will be too hard. Then you can see more in advance if it's a good project or not, or if there are any ways to change/tone down those difficult sections and make them easier.

But ultimately if you want to get better at writing Java, then just write more Java!

Offline CaptainJester

JGO Knight


Medals: 12
Projects: 2
Exp: 14 years


Make it work; make it better.


« Reply #5 - Posted 2009-08-17 15:43:53 »

When I first learned Java I wanted to do the same thing.  Find a project that I could practice with.  An easy solution is to make something that already exists.  One easy one is to take Notepad from Windows and try to make it in Java, as close to exactly the same as the original.  It was a great learning experience for me.  Don't try to make it better in any way.  It is hard enough to get it to work without adding feature creep.  Once you finish it a second project could be to make a list of improvements and try them out.

Game wise my first Java game was Minesweeper.

Offline ManaSink

Senior Newbie





« Reply #6 - Posted 2009-08-17 16:10:11 »

I dont have any basic projects im willing to practice or work on, most of the projects I try to do end up being too hard and I can never finish them...

Man, I think most of us here have fought with this.  Here is my advice:

  • Leverage a framework.  kevglass (Slick2D) and others here have already tackled the tough problems that will knock the wind out of you. They open-sourced their stuff, so until you build up a codebase of your own, I suggest you drive it like you stole it.
  • Pretend it's your job.  At work you can't blow off your current task to do something more exciting, or you'll get fired.  At home, there is no one to force you to do all the crap work, so it is easy to get side-tracked on some nifty new idea.  This kills your forward momentum, avoid it at all costs, (or your fired!  Wink )
  • Put your ego on the back burner.  WoW took 100+ guys 5 years to finish.  Do the math, unless you have 500 years of free time to burn, you better get used to the idea of making a much smaller game.
  • If you still can't finish that smaller game, reduce scope until you can.  The only thing less fun than an unpolished game that is barely playable is an unfinished one that can't be played at all.

Good luck man, hit us up with questions if you get stuck.  Grin
Offline shatterblast

Senior Newbie




Noobier Than Thou


« Reply #7 - Posted 2009-08-17 17:14:45 »

WoW took 100+ guys 5 years to finish.

Actually, the core of the game took less than a year to make.  All the content and debugging related to it took time.  It's that conflict when an artist wants something unavailable, but the feature somehow breaks the nice working code.  And of course, the publisher wants the combination invented sometime... yesterday.

I think that game's starting core only required one to three people, and I'm sure one of them didn't work directly for Blizzard.  Otherwise, all else seems true.

Offline ManaSink

Senior Newbie





« Reply #8 - Posted 2009-08-17 17:29:11 »

I was just trying to convey that biting off the scope of a typical A-list game is unwise for most indie developers.   I have no problem reducing my estimate of 500 man-years of work to match your estimate of 100 man-years of work.    Roll Eyes

Offline shatterblast

Senior Newbie




Noobier Than Thou


« Reply #9 - Posted 2009-08-17 17:50:35 »

I was just trying to convey that biting off the scope of a typical A-list game is unwise for most indie developers.   I have no problem reducing my estimate of 500 man-years of work to match your estimate of 100 man-years of work.    Roll Eyes

Yes, quite good of you, but 100 more people-years should suffice.  We shouldn't forget women and children.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline markmistry

Junior Member





« Reply #10 - Posted 2009-08-20 16:00:16 »

You get your self a java helloworld program and build on it bit by bit.
then you give it an added feature then you observe it see what errors it throws at you and understand why it did what it did.
for practice keep changing it adding features and bit by bit you will master the language, method by method ,api by api.
Experimenting will give you good insight with out trying to write specific projects.practice is but repetition,doing the same thing till its embeded in your cerra bellum.
Offline h3ckboy

JGO Coder


Medals: 5



« Reply #11 - Posted 2009-08-20 16:54:44 »

first hting I got to ask is, do you have the basics of java game programming. Or just general purpose?
Pages: [1]
  ignore  |  Print  
 
 
You cannot reply to this message, because it is very, very old.

 

Add your game by posting it in the WIP section,
or publish it in Showcase.

The first screenshot will be displayed as a thumbnail.

Dwinin (15 views)
2014-09-12 09:08:26

Norakomi (45 views)
2014-09-10 13:57:51

TehJavaDev (57 views)
2014-09-10 06:39:09

Tekkerue (26 views)
2014-09-09 02:24:56

mitcheeb (49 views)
2014-09-08 06:06:29

BurntPizza (33 views)
2014-09-07 01:13:42

Longarmx (19 views)
2014-09-07 01:12:14

Longarmx (21 views)
2014-09-07 01:11:22

Longarmx (20 views)
2014-09-07 01:10:19

mitcheeb (30 views)
2014-09-04 23:08:59
List of Learning Resources
by Longor1996
2014-08-16 10:40:00

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-08-05 19:33:27

Resources for WIP games
by CogWheelz
2014-08-01 16:20:17

Resources for WIP games
by CogWheelz
2014-08-01 16:19:50

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-07-31 16:29:50

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-07-31 16:26:06

List of Learning Resources
by SilverTiger
2014-07-31 11:54:12

HotSpot Options
by dleskov
2014-07-08 01:59:08
java-gaming.org is not responsible for the content posted by its members, including references to external websites, and other references that may or may not have a relation with our primarily gaming and game production oriented community. inquiries and complaints can be sent via email to the info‑account of the company managing the website of java‑gaming.org
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Managed by Enhanced Four Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!