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  Which Compiler do you use to Make games ?  (Read 5990 times)
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Offline pjt33
« Reply #30 - Posted 2009-04-23 12:32:28 »

Not to speak of error prevention (at least typos are unlikely with code completion)
You've clearly never experienced the horror of a project where someone typoed the name of a method they were writing and then auto-completed hundreds of calls to it. Anyone who spells the name correctly then has to work out why it doesn't compile. Still, at least most IDEs with autocompletion also have some refactoring support.
Offline DzzD
« Reply #31 - Posted 2009-04-23 17:12:28 »

There is so much more to an IDE than code completion and I fully believe, that an IDE boost your productivity by 100 - 500%. Just because it is able to make your ideas quickly work.

If you talk about specific IDE : like Versata for business project or a GameCreator one for game, yes probably but if you talk about generic IDE you fools yourself....

Offline Ru5tyNZ

Senior Newbie





« Reply #32 - Posted 2009-04-23 22:46:10 »

If you talk about specific IDE : like Versata for business project or a GameCreator one for game, yes probably but if you talk about generic IDE you fools yourself....

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Offline Mr. Gol

Senior Member


Medals: 1



« Reply #33 - Posted 2009-04-25 12:32:38 »

You've clearly never experienced the horror of a project where someone typoed the name of a method they were writing and then auto-completed hundreds of calls to it. Anyone who spells the name correctly then has to work out why it doesn't compile. Still, at least most IDEs with autocompletion also have some refactoring support.

You should work with an outsourced team, I no longer care about correct English in class and method names Smiley
Offline bienator

Senior Member




OutOfCoffeeException


« Reply #34 - Posted 2009-04-25 12:53:23 »

You should work with an outsourced team, I no longer care about correct English in class and method names Smiley
as long they don't write code and doc in leet i would say its ok Tongue

In worst case add a translation layer between your and the outsourced code it often has the benefit to look less like c code Wink

Offline Darrin

Junior Member


Projects: 1



« Reply #35 - Posted 2009-04-28 15:04:45 »

I really like Netbeans.   

autocomplete.
nice help.
easy to set up project properties like command line runs for the jvm.
easy to load your files into a jar.
easy to compile for different versions of java
//TODO list rocks.
group commenting/uncommenting
easy package organization and auto add.
great refactor
members view
long undo memory


The only thing I haven't figured out or I don't find very useful is the debug.  For some reason it is not intuitive and I almost never use it.   I end up just using system.out for depugging.   Seems like there should be a faster way to get variable information.   



Offline fireside

Senior Newbie





« Reply #36 - Posted 2009-04-28 15:36:02 »

I like Netbeans, also.  I tried Eclipse first, but it just seemed too hard setting up a project with it.  Once it was set up I was fine, though.  I remember reading the description on setting up an applet on Eclipse and I just shook my head.  It's still a little strange in Netbeans, but at least I can actually remember it.  I like the tutorials for Netbeans better than the ones I found for Eclipse, and they're all in one place right on the site.  It also makes a nice jar file that I just have to upload in a dist folder with my resources in there.
Offline Mr_Light

Senior Member




shiny.


« Reply #37 - Posted 2009-04-28 17:41:41 »

I love Mylyn, documentation at my fingertips, project wide re-factoring and the debugger.

I love eclipse as it does not require me to remember a single shortcut. Netbeans - although it still feels clunky - is getting better. I'm actually using it as a platform for some rich client applications. One thing really simple that I'm annoyed with - the stupid red line that is based on paper and monospaced stuff in the console, sorry but some of us left that period behind ourself, and all the bad software practices that come with it. HOW DO I GET RID OF IT

It's harder to read code than to write it. - it's even harder to write readable code.

The gospel of brother Riven: "The guarantee that all bugs are in *your* code is worth gold." Amen brother a-m-e-n.
Offline ImNotBacon

Junior Member




Don't eat me


« Reply #38 - Posted 2009-05-04 22:49:18 »

I use nano and javac.  
Offline bobjob

JGO Knight


Medals: 10
Projects: 4


David Aaron Muhar


« Reply #39 - Posted 2009-05-04 22:59:36 »

+1 for eclipse

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Offline GDX

Senior Newbie





« Reply #40 - Posted 2009-05-05 15:58:01 »

Eclipse 3.2
Sun JDK 1.6

Features that I really appreciate: autocomplete, easy refactoring, incremental compiling, tooltip class help,  plugins! (like for SVN), the fact that you can edit, compile, build, version, debug, and deploy from one GUI... There's more but that's what comes to mind. It definitely makes me more productive.

Caveats: You can find these features in other IDEs, of course. Also, there are some people who really prefer using CLIs and scripting everything themselves, which in some cases, results in quicker results than IDEs doing the same work --- since the scripts don't usually have a lot of overhead code. Bottom line, just experiment and find what works best for you. It's nice to have choices... Cheesy
Offline gouessej
« Reply #41 - Posted 2009-05-05 16:20:56 »

I agree with DzzD about one thing: using a powerful IDE when you're a beginner is a very bad idea, it is pedagogically inefficient. I used JBuilder some years ago, Eclipse now and sometimes Netbeans, they have allowed me to save some time, especially the profiler of Netbeans and the debugger of Eclipse (I find watch points very useful). It allows to go through a large source code very quickly and it is very intuitive. I don't imagine going back to Nedit, emacs and vim  Grin

Offline ImNotBacon

Junior Member




Don't eat me


« Reply #42 - Posted 2009-05-05 17:33:47 »

I love autocompletion and refactoring tools, but the "project" abstraction annoys me. There are decent single document based editors like ScITE, but I'm faster on a command line, so I only use them for big copy-pastes or find-and-replaces.

Plus, I love being able to ssh to my home computer from my phone and edit code.
Offline cylab

JGO Ninja


Medals: 38



« Reply #43 - Posted 2009-05-05 19:29:14 »

Plus, I love being able to ssh to my home computer from my phone and edit code.

Holy shit. I am feeling sooo ungeeky. I can't even write a sms on my phone, let alone wanting to edit code....

Mathias - I Know What [you] Did Last Summer!
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