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  My Highschool class is making an MMORPG...  (Read 28189 times)
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Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #30 - Posted 2008-04-27 01:05:47 »

http://ak.kiet.le.googlepages.com/theredbookinjava.html

Any idea how to get the source code for the JNLP files there? I click on the examples, it downloads them and launches them in Java Webstart. If I try to open the jnlp file in Filzip, it shows nothing. Any ideas?

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline hawkwind

Junior Member




Java games rock!


« Reply #31 - Posted 2008-04-27 01:07:37 »

Wanted to put in a plug for Xith3D at xith.org and the Java Monkey Engine (JME). 

I agree with many of the warnings posted on this thread.  My advice is to learn to use a high level API and delve in to the innards if/when you have the time, where it makes sense to do so.  EVERYBODY wants their first project to be an RPG, make cool maps, etc.  It is this wish that usually indicates a newer game developer, not a bad thing but you may not realize the magnitude of what you want to do..  I could go on for pages on just how cool my never completed game was.

Anyways, the xith API is a Java3D like scenegraph, with a well defined HUD (for menus, inventory, conversations, etc.),  a neat class for support "first person" movements, collisions, avatar, etc within the scene.  Also has a well written intro doc.

Your big advantage with this API,  is the huge number of example programs, small java apps demoing a specific aspects of the API..  This allows you to identify some portion of your game you need to work on,.  find an example similar to what you need, and then extend you game.  I personally absolutely need to see periodic progress in my game dev, otherwise I get agitated.   The only way to develop a large game is in incremental steps,  since you most likely do not have time or the experience to write up a requirement spec and architecture doc.  Incremental improvements allow you to change directions as the design of your game changes over time.  A strong developer presence also helps.

While I am unfamiliar with the Java Monkey Engine (JME) they also seem to provide higher level abstraction with the ability to get into the innards where you need to, they also have a strong developer community.

Offline bienator

Senior Member




OutOfCoffeeException


« Reply #32 - Posted 2008-04-27 01:52:35 »

http://ak.kiet.le.googlepages.com/theredbookinjava.html

Any idea how to get the source code for the JNLP files there? I click on the examples, it downloads them and launches them in Java Webstart. If I try to open the jnlp file in Filzip, it shows nothing. Any ideas?
there should be a link somewhere on the page. JNLP files can be opened with any text editor they only declare the start process of the app and do not include content.

the Red Book samples + official JOGL demos are also as ready to run projects included in the NetBeans OpenGL Pack.

Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline irreversible_kev

Junior Member





« Reply #33 - Posted 2008-04-27 15:09:12 »

Any idea how to get the source code for the JNLP files there?

Look for glredbook-src.rar on the right side

I think that there is no doubt that the project will move along slower and will not accomplish as much technically if you use JOGL rather than say JMonkeyEngine or Xith, but if you persevere you will accomplish more in terms of having a better understanding of OpenGL and 3D graphics (If thats what you are in this for).

I do like the idea of coding all the stuff myself in OpenGL as I feel I would understand exactly what is going on, but I bet if some serious games developers wanted to make a MMORPG they would use something like JMonkeyEngine. They don't care about how it works - they know how it works and they don't want to code it again.

Just out of curiosity what class are you doing this for?
Offline irrisor

Junior Member





« Reply #34 - Posted 2008-04-27 19:31:06 »

They don't care about how it works - they know how it works
The first part is not entirely true imo Smiley - but the second part is. And that's why Trussell's class does use LWJGL directly: they do not know how it works yet. Still I would recommend to switch to a scenegraph engine as soon as you are familiar with GL concepts (and can afford it).
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #35 - Posted 2008-04-27 21:24:58 »

The course is titled "3D Graphics and Game Programming," and we have to write our own engine, like I said, since it's a programming course, using jME is out of the question. Xith, as I understand it, is simply a library like JOGL is, so it's possible we could use that.

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline cylab

JGO Knight


Medals: 34



« Reply #36 - Posted 2008-04-27 22:50:05 »

XIth and jME are both game engines with a scene graph.

Mathias - I Know What [you] Did Last Summer!
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #37 - Posted 2008-04-27 23:09:35 »

I see. We won't use any premade game engines.

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline malberts

Junior Member





« Reply #38 - Posted 2008-04-27 23:49:36 »

Have you noticed that you are contradicting yourself? The one moment you say that just because you're in high school doesn't mean you don't have the skills and the next moment you say you're a total noob. Then you say you have the whole year with a talented teacher and class and the next moment you say you're doing it solo without the teacher for 3 months.

So what will you be doing in those 3 months? Learn JOGL? And how many of the other students know JOGL? You're the lead developer, but you admit you still need to learn a lot. What does that imply of your team's skills?

In my university OpenGL for c++ is a 1 year module and that doesn't even come close to games. So even if you did manage to learn JOGL in the first 3 months, you still won't know how to load complicated structures and maps. Then you haven't even started with the rest of the engine. Engine design is a complicated process, that's why people use existing engines. Suppose you finish the MMORPG engine with a few months to spare, what game do you have at that moment? You'l probably need to have some form of scripting support for the story too. Do you even have some sort of story or is this a free for all? Do you have the artwork and models? Audio? Then you'll need to test the game, make sure everything is balanced, etc.

And during all this time I assume you have other classes in high school too?

None of us are trying to launch an assault on you as a person when we say you shouldn't do this. When the people say noobs don't make MMORPGs and you admit you're a noob, don't you think you should take the advice?

A cool idea for a first game could be some sort of Galaxian or Space Invaders but with 3D models and so forth. Then you'll have a game that uses the basic concepts that you need for a more advanced game like loading models.

But I guess you won't listen so maybe you should rather post in the JOGL section in the forum. People who see MMORPG in a Newbie section will have a quick head shake and move along. The newbie section is more used for example by people who have problems getting 2d in a Jpanel. But go ahead and ask the questions in a different section and only ask about specific JOGL problems, not how to learn JOGL.

In space no-one can hear you System.out.println()
Offline malberts

Junior Member





« Reply #39 - Posted 2008-04-27 23:55:00 »

On a last note, I made a side scrolling shooter for my high school project and I had absolutely no experience. I only had KGPJ and it was hard to understand double buffering and stuff like that. And I started reading about that the year before I started the game. And so I struggled forth learning basic techniques for a game engine and how to implements structures we didn't learn. So eventually (about 2 weeks before the hand in date) I got to the point of actually implementing the game content. My levels weren't planned, the game itself wasn't near the representation of the trouble of the engine. I spent too much time learning how to do something. I'm in no way an expert in anything but what I can tell you is this: rather think small and expand along the way, than think big and ultimately not reach your goal.

In space no-one can hear you System.out.println()
Games published by our own members! Check 'em out!
Legends of Yore - The Casual Retro Roguelike
Offline malberts

Junior Member





« Reply #40 - Posted 2008-04-28 00:13:29 »

Lastly, the engines mentioned here (as far as I know, I might be wrong) only provide the raw framework. You still need to add your own code to get a game, these engines aren't "add sprites, add sounds, add story, game finished" engines. They provide the mechanisms for loading graphics, rendering, collision detection, etc. If your course focused on making a good game then using an existing engine is the obvious choice. But it appears that the class is more concerned about doing the low level stuff done in an engine? If so, then it would be much better to do a simple engine with a good game to showcase the engine than a big engine that doesn't reach its potential. If the game doesn't matter, then you need only do the engine in a theoretical way and let the teacher suffer :-).

In space no-one can hear you System.out.println()
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #41 - Posted 2008-04-28 01:03:14 »

The class is focused on the programming of the games, so using an existing engine won't fly. However, none of us are ever going to give up. You may be right, we may suffer horribly and have a shit game. We'll still have learned a lot about JOGL and Java3D in the process, and we'll still be better off. I'm just not going to give up on making this game. I'm a good programmer, just a noob when it comes to JOGL and 3D graphics programming because I've never taken a class on that. I'm doing it solo for the first three months (aka the summer) because we won't have class then, and the rest of the year will be with my teacher and classmates.

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #42 - Posted 2008-04-28 02:42:47 »

Lastly, the engines mentioned here (as far as I know, I might be wrong) only provide the raw framework. You still need to add your own code to get a game, these engines aren't "add sprites, add sounds, add story, game finished" engines. They provide the mechanisms for loading graphics, rendering, collision detection, etc

Having thought hard about this, I think we'll make the game using jME, and once we've taken the full class and learned about JOGL, we can write our own Game Engine and convert the game back to being on our GE so it's 100% ours. Thanks for all of the advice.

Is jME just a library of methods and classes?

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline SimonH
« Reply #43 - Posted 2008-04-28 02:57:29 »

Is jME just a library of methods and classes?

Here

Harken to my words: DO YOUR RESEARCH! Every hour spent researching at the start saves a week panicking at the end.

People make games and games make people
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #44 - Posted 2008-04-28 04:12:09 »

Here

Harken to my words: DO YOUR RESEARCH! Every hour spent researching at the start saves a week panicking at the end.

I followed the install guide <a href = "http://www.jmonkeyengine.com/wiki/doku.php?id=getting_started" > here </a> that was supposed to "install" jMonkeyEngine into my NetBeans IDE. I followed all of the directions, but when I get to the last step which says to run a file in the jME-Physics_2 project, it doesn't work.

I attempted to run the file TestChooser.java under com.jmetest.physics. Any idea why it's not working? The error I get is this...

java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: and
Caused by: java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: and
        at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:200)
        at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(URLClassLoader.java:188)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:306)
        at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Launcher.java:276)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:251)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClassInternal(ClassLoader.java:319)
Exception in thread "main"
Java Result: 1

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline Matzon

JGO Knight


Medals: 19
Projects: 2


I'm gonna wring your pants!


« Reply #45 - Posted 2008-04-28 07:43:44 »

The above post really sums it up well  Roll Eyes

The error you have is a classpath issue - one of the most common - and easy to resolve. You are probably "missing" two quotes in your command line and you are executing from within a folder that contains a 'and' with spaces in it. ie. c:\documents and settings\me\desktop\jme-test needs to be "c:\documents and settings\me\desktop\jme-test"

Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #46 - Posted 2008-04-28 08:35:00 »

I'm executing from Netbeans, so where would I go to change that?

EDIT: Wow, I'm an idiot. I put my library arguments (-Djava...) in VM options instead of in arguments.

Now I face a NEW problem. New and exciting, how about that.

I tried to execute a demo (generate terrain, specifically) and I get this error. I may be an idiot, but didn't jMonkeyEngine have LWJGL in it's libraries already?

java.lang.UnsatisfiedLinkError: no lwjgl in java.library.path
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadLibrary(ClassLoader.java:1682)
        at java.lang.Runtime.loadLibrary0(Runtime.java:823)
        at java.lang.System.loadLibrary(System.java:1030)
        at org.lwjgl.Sys$1.run(Sys.java:75)
        at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
        at org.lwjgl.Sys.doLoadLibrary(Sys.java:68)
        at org.lwjgl.Sys.loadLibrary(Sys.java:84)
        at org.lwjgl.Sys.<clinit>(Sys.java:101)
        at org.lwjgl.opengl.Display.<clinit>(Display.java:111)
        at com.jme.system.lwjgl.LWJGLPropertiesDialog$ModesRetriever.run(Unknown Source)
        at com.jme.system.lwjgl.LWJGLPropertiesDialog.<init>(Unknown Source)
        at com.jme.system.lwjgl.LWJGLPropertiesDialog.<init>(Unknown Source)
        at com.jmetest.physics.SimplePhysicsTest.getAttributes(SimplePhysicsTest.java:63)
        at com.jme.app.BaseGame.start(Unknown Source)
        at com.jmetest.physics.TestDomino$1.run(TestDomino.java:163)
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 6 seconds)

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline tom
« Reply #47 - Posted 2008-04-28 08:58:48 »

You have to download and install LWJGL seperately. I think the JME 1.0 uses LWJGL version 1.0. Go to www.lwjgl.org and follow the download link. On souceforge you can download the 1.0 version. The dll files must be in the "current directory" of the application. Or set up Djava.library.path. Or put it in the lib/ext folder of the runtime. The jars you include like the jme jars.

BTW, LWJGL is an opengl binding, just like jogl.

Offline irrisor

Junior Member





« Reply #48 - Posted 2008-04-28 09:06:04 »

You have to download and install LWJGL seperately. I think the JME 1.0 uses LWJGL version 1.0.
no no, lwjgl is in the lib folder of jME.

The problem is that:
EDIT: Wow, I'm an idiot. I put my library arguments (-Djava...) in VM options instead of in arguments.
-Djava.library.path=... must go into VM options. By putting it into the program arguments you created an additional error and did not solve the former one. As Matzon said, your runtime classpath is misconfigured or another possibility would be another exception (before the posted one), which hinders class loading.
Offline princec

JGO Kernel


Medals: 284
Projects: 3
Exp: 16 years


Eh? Who? What? ... Me?


« Reply #49 - Posted 2008-04-28 13:32:59 »

I'm in two minds about what to say in this thread as I twiddle me thumbs waiting for Chaz to put the finishing touches to Droid Assault...

On the one hand, this project I can say with absolute certainty will probably deliver almost nothing like a MMORPG. In fact it'll be nothing short of a miracle if it even gets the G part done let alone the RP or the O, M and M. Just writing a 2D shooter using OpenGL and Java would be a reasonably ambitious project for a green team at highschool. (However it would definitely fall into the realms of possibility that such a 2D shooter would in fact be a) finished and b) even very good and c) well documented coz you won't get any marks for just dumping a pile of code on the examiner's desk!!)

But on the other hand it will be a brilliant and probably fun way to learn about how not to do a bunch of stuff. The question is, as it will certainly not work out, what are you going to be able to hand in at the end of it to pass the course?

Cas Smiley

Offline Orangy Tang

JGO Kernel


Medals: 51
Projects: 11


Monkey for a head


« Reply #50 - Posted 2008-04-28 14:38:36 »

But on the other hand it will be a brilliant and probably fun way to learn about how not to do a bunch of stuff. The question is, as it will certainly not work out, what are you going to be able to hand in at the end of it to pass the course?

Given that a single teacher is going to be hearding an entire "team" of inexperienced programmers creating an MMO, I'd be surprised if the teacher has any sanity left at the end for marking. Smiley

[ TriangularPixels.com - Play Growth Spurt, Rescue Squad and Snowman Village ] [ Rebirth - game resource library ]
Offline CaptainJester

JGO Knight


Medals: 12
Projects: 2


Make it work; make it better.


« Reply #51 - Posted 2008-04-28 17:19:15 »

One thing you can do is limit your scope a bit.  You should maybe go for a MOFPS(Multiplayer Online First Person Shooter).  Forget massive and go for just 8-12 users.  You will still have the online multiplayer part, which is hard enough.  Doing an FPS requires a lot less content and level design than an RPG.  Make a Quake/Half-Life type game and that will still reach your goals.  It should also be more satisfying, because you would have a better chance of completing it.

Offline dipse

Junior Newbie





« Reply #52 - Posted 2008-04-28 18:06:19 »

One thing you can do is limit your scope a bit.  You should maybe go for a MOFPS(Multiplayer Online First Person Shooter).  Forget massive and go for just 8-12 users.  You will still have the online multiplayer part, which is hard enough.  Doing an FPS requires a lot less content and level design than an RPG.  Make a Quake/Half-Life type game and that will still reach your goals.  It should also be more satisfying, because you would have a better chance of completing it.
I suggest making a MOFPS like CaptainJester suggested. The book killer game programming in Java even contains a working example that you can build upon.
Offline Mr_Light

Senior Member




shiny.


« Reply #53 - Posted 2008-04-29 00:41:59 »

The class is focused on the programming of the games, so using an existing engine won't fly.
I don't follow, why would you want to write things from scratch? should we drop some 64 bit assembly code tutorials on you so you can write the os on which your game run's first?

I would recommend taking whatever there is and use it, as soon as stuff wears you down swap it out and swap into new stuff. Then you'll come at a point where the avail stuff doesn't fit your needs and you can implement it yourself. Even if you where to write everything from scratch at the relevant level's of the system you would still need place holders for parts you haven't written yet; you can't test parts by them self. Sure you can start working on everything at the same time but then you won't get finished cause your not focused. (just look at any engineering job without fixed constraints.(time, monney, etc) there are ton's of case studies on this.)

Ok before I get to actual technical stuff, a tip: Ask your(or a) teacher if he knows a teacher at collage/uni so they can open up the university's online databanks for you. It turned a smile on my face to see a twenty year old theory being described in a dusted piece of paper and while I was reading though it, described pretty much the UT99 bullet prediction/ network code.

On a more technical note your server side stuff: from the brief amount of information you gave I can only guess that your way off track. Leave the databases alone and work on non persisted java objects. By the time you actually worked towards a game that needs to run longer then 5 min for testing, you should have had enough headaches that you can make better decisions on all that.

Anyway good luck, doing this while in high school is probably the best idea as you  don't have bills to pay and a lot of free time. But as you noticed access to information is  a big obstacle.

p.s. a big team isn't always a blessing, things might actually take longer.

It's harder to read code than to write it. - it's even harder to write readable code.

The gospel of brother Riven: "The guarantee that all bugs are in *your* code is worth gold." Amen brother a-m-e-n.
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #54 - Posted 2008-04-29 07:46:49 »

no no, lwjgl is in the lib folder of jME.

The problem is that:-Djava.library.path=... must go into VM options. By putting it into the program arguments you created an additional error and did not solve the former one. As Matzon said, your runtime classpath is misconfigured or another possibility would be another exception (before the posted one), which hinders class loading.

I copied and pasted from a website and for some reason they were using two ' signs instead of a single ". That was the problem.

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline Eli Delventhal

JGO Kernel


Medals: 42
Projects: 12


Game Engineer


« Reply #55 - Posted 2008-05-01 20:26:14 »

[EDIT]
Sorry, a lot of this may be redundant for you – I didn't see the last 3 pages of posts for some reason.
[/EDIT]

Pfft, don't listen to um, just go for it! Smiley

Kev
I second Kev. When I was in high school, I started work on tons of projects. They were never finished, but I learned an incredible amount in the process. Although everyone here is being a bit overly frank with you, the only real reasons for that are two: 1) tons of new users come in asking how you make an MMORPG (hmmm... MMORPG + Me = $$$$), having little to no idea what they're getting into. 2) It seems like you want and are expecting a complete and working project, which makes you seem like someone from #1.

If you're not like #1, then prove it by being fully aware of your limitations. Don't expect to get your project done. Expect a lot to go wrong. But, expect to learn mountains. The more difficult a project, the less likely you are too succeed, but the more capable you will be afterwards.

All that being said, here's a bit of advice.
• Don't use JOGL, use LWJGL. The latter also has useful things like OpenAL and JInput attached.
• Try jME (J Monkey Engine) for your 3D scenegraph (if you are willing to go for 3D). It can load many different types of models.
• I would use straight-up MySQL queries rather than Sockets. Although this gives you a bit less freedom because you can't have a server app, it's way easier. Sockets can lead to tons of inexplicable freezing and game-breaking. And because your game probably won't ever be too popular (like thousands of players), this should be modular enough for you.
• Buy or find a book on database design before you make your database. This is something you can not do intuitively. You've got to learn it.
• Create a series of "tech demos" to get the different aspects of the game working rather than trying to put it all together right away.

And another moment of warning: I was in almost the same situation as you, only I was with college students rather than high school ones, and I was the instructor. With me, a co-instructor (who handled the artists), and 15 students, we made an MMORPG. This was last semester. I spent the entire semester before planning – creating development schedules, writing pseudo code, deciding on the classes we would need, etc. That means 4 months passed before any team members ever even knew what they were making. I must stress the importance of proper planning.

And we made the game in... what language? LSL. Linden Scripting Language. In SecondLife. Because I knew that in 4 months there was no way in hell we would be able to create a capable 3D engine, networking engine, physics engine, etc. So by making it in SecondLife all that was already provided. And yet, at the close of the semester, the game was incomplete. Don't get me wrong, an incredible amount was done and it was very close, but there wasn't enough time to fix bugs or do QA.

My conclusion? A year is way shorter than you think, especially if you've got no prior experience with a lot of this stuff. And, once again, I'm really not trying to dissuade you, I'm just revealing the gritty truth of it with a real-world example. A team of 17 people with (likely) more experience than your team, making an MMORPG within SecondLife, with 4 months of prior planning, still wasn't able to get it all done.

But, do it! Just be realistic.

See my work:
OTC Software
Offline Trussell

Junior Member




Game Developer


« Reply #56 - Posted 2008-05-02 06:36:29 »

[EDIT]
Sorry, a lot of this may be redundant for you – I didn't see the last 3 pages of posts for some reason.
[/EDIT]
I second Kev. When I was in high school, I started work on tons of projects. They were never finished, but I learned an incredible amount in the process. Although everyone here is being a bit overly frank with you, the only real reasons for that are two: 1) tons of new users come in asking how you make an MMORPG (hmmm... MMORPG + Me = $$$$), having little to no idea what they're getting into. 2) It seems like you want and are expecting a complete and working project, which makes you seem like someone from #1.

If you're not like #1, then prove it by being fully aware of your limitations. Don't expect to get your project done. Expect a lot to go wrong. But, expect to learn mountains. The more difficult a project, the less likely you are too succeed, but the more capable you will be afterwards.

All that being said, here's a bit of advice.
• Don't use JOGL, use LWJGL. The latter also has useful things like OpenAL and JInput attached.
• Try jME (J Monkey Engine) for your 3D scenegraph (if you are willing to go for 3D). It can load many different types of models.
• I would use straight-up MySQL queries rather than Sockets. Although this gives you a bit less freedom because you can't have a server app, it's way easier. Sockets can lead to tons of inexplicable freezing and game-breaking. And because your game probably won't ever be too popular (like thousands of players), this should be modular enough for you.
• Buy or find a book on database design before you make your database. This is something you can not do intuitively. You've got to learn it.
• Create a series of "tech demos" to get the different aspects of the game working rather than trying to put it all together right away.

And another moment of warning: I was in almost the same situation as you, only I was with college students rather than high school ones, and I was the instructor. With me, a co-instructor (who handled the artists), and 15 students, we made an MMORPG. This was last semester. I spent the entire semester before planning – creating development schedules, writing pseudo code, deciding on the classes we would need, etc. That means 4 months passed before any team members ever even knew what they were making. I must stress the importance of proper planning.

And we made the game in... what language? LSL. Linden Scripting Language. In SecondLife. Because I knew that in 4 months there was no way in hell we would be able to create a capable 3D engine, networking engine, physics engine, etc. So by making it in SecondLife all that was already provided. And yet, at the close of the semester, the game was incomplete. Don't get me wrong, an incredible amount was done and it was very close, but there wasn't enough time to fix bugs or do QA.

My conclusion? A year is way shorter than you think, especially if you've got no prior experience with a lot of this stuff. And, once again, I'm really not trying to dissuade you, I'm just revealing the gritty truth of it with a real-world example. A team of 17 people with (likely) more experience than your team, making an MMORPG within SecondLife, with 4 months of prior planning, still wasn't able to get it all done.

But, do it! Just be realistic.

I've already started using jMonkey Engine.

I am a noob attempting to make a video game.
Offline Orangy Tang

JGO Kernel


Medals: 51
Projects: 11


Monkey for a head


« Reply #57 - Posted 2008-05-02 10:42:12 »

The course is titled "3D Graphics and Game Programming," and we have to write our own engine, like I said, since it's a programming course, using jME is out of the question.

I've already started using jMonkey Engine.

Make your mind up. Roll Eyes

[ TriangularPixels.com - Play Growth Spurt, Rescue Squad and Snowman Village ] [ Rebirth - game resource library ]
Offline TheAnalogKid

JGO Coder


Projects: 3



« Reply #58 - Posted 2008-05-02 15:06:58 »

Trussell, you really seem to have a big problem with the scope of your project. In any computer science, be professional or not, scope is the critique aspect that can completely make the project fail.

Offline princec

JGO Kernel


Medals: 284
Projects: 3
Exp: 16 years


Eh? Who? What? ... Me?


« Reply #59 - Posted 2008-05-03 15:56:05 »

Here's a bit of realistic, anecdotal scope: each of our games Titan Attacks, Ultratron, and Droid Assault took five months full time with a developer and an artist working on them, plus about another month of tweaking and bugfixing and patching, plus some amount of time outsourced to others to make the music. So basically 12 man months to do really simple little 2D games from concept to sale - and although there's actually a surprisingly large amount of content in these games, we're also very experienced and have a smoothly oiled toolchain. And we didn't have to document any of it.

Cas Smiley

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